What's on

Drama performances, events and seminars are shown here. Please remember that coursework performances may not appear until a week before the performance, so please check back regularly. See also the Conferences page.

Scroll down the list below to find the event you'd like to make a reservation for.

Wed 17 Jan

Start time: 14:00

Admission Free
University tickets SOLD OUT
No public tickets available
End Time: 17:00

Workshop: Drama School Auditions

Presented by: Stephen Hudson - Course Leader MA Acting, Arts Ed
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Requirements – Participants will be required to move freely within the workshop so please wear clothes suitable for this: jeans will not be appropriate. Please be prepared to work in bare feet. Participants need to have learnt some text for the workshop, e.g. an audition monologue, a poem etc. It needs to be at least 30 secs in length.

2pm       WORKSHOP

Exploring how to find spontaneity and impulse response

Discovering impulses informed by the sub-conscious

Applying these discoveries to text to find different, less conscious choices in performance

3:45        AUDITION EXPERIENCE

Giving you the opportunity to perform a monologue in an audition style setting

We will ‘masterclass’ this part of the afternoon, i.e. not everyone will have the opportunity to share their monologue

4:30        Q & A

An opportunity to ask questions about a vocational acting training (with particular reference to a Masters programme)

5:00        WORKSHOP ENDS

Stephen Hudson has worked as an actor, director and composer for 20 years. Having trained at Drama Centre London, he has developed a physical practice which runs alongside the more psychological process of his initial training. He has been a Viewpoints practitioner for 25 years and is one of the only practitioners of Meyerhold’s Biomechanics in the UK, having trained under Master Gennadi Bogdanov. For the past 7 years he has worked exclusively on MA programmes (predominantly at Central & East 15) which has culminated in becoming the Course Director at Arts Ed, where he has developed a programme to maximise the potential of vocational training within a condensed, 1-year time frame.

Link to Arts Ed website: https://artsed.co.uk/acting/acting-ma-home

Wed 17 Jan

Start time: 16:00


Tickets for students/staff: 17
Tickets for public: 10
Admission Free
End Time: 17:30

The Musical Pathways Project

Location: TS3 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

The Musical Pathways Project - collaboratively performing wellbeing
Gary Ansdell, Nordoff Robbins and Exeter University
Tia DeNora, Exeter University

The Musical Pathways project followed the musical lives of people living with enduring mental health conditions over a period of ten years. It tracked changes in health and social status/identity in relaiton to musical activity and developing musical skills. We will desribe how music, and being 'in' music, offered scaffolding and support for mutual performances of 'being well' - in ways that recursively nurtured the future performance of being well, and functioning in shared social worlds. 

Wed 07 Feb

Start time: 13:30


Tickets for students/staff: 19
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 16:30

Shakespeare Simplified: First Folio Text Techniques for Actors

Presented by: Susanna Wilson
Location: TS1 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

First Workshop: Males Only

Let Shakespeare’s First Folio help you ‘Speak the speech… trippingly on the tongue.’
The First Folio is as close as one can get to what Shakespeare originally wrote.  Editors have since made changes in punctuation and spelling to “modernise” the text, even breaking prose into poetry and/or poetry into prose.  Because Shakespeare’s plays are meant to be spoken and heard, not silently read, the original text includes performance clues such as tempo, pace, stressed words, and more.  Using First Folio Technique removes any confusion or intimidation these words may hold for the actor.

As part of a practical research investigation into creating gender identity through Shakespeare’s text, participants will be divided into two groups, one male, one female; each group will explore text spoken by both female and male characters in Shakespeare’s plays.  Actors will learn the fundamentals of First Folio Technique through group and individual exercises, with the opportunity to investigate further into one particular play, The Taming of the Shrew.

Bio:  Susanna Wilson began her professional theatre career in Seattle, Washington more than twenty-five years ago.  As a director, adapter, and producer, Susanna has been instrumental in bringing more than 30 works to the stage for multiple companies in the United States, including Book-It Repertory Theatre (a ‘page-to-stage’ company), Seattle Public Theatre, ArtsWest Playhouse, Theater Schmeater, and others.  From 2008 – 2010, Susanna served as the Artistic Director of SecondStory Repertory Theatre in Redmond, Washington.  She has helped nine seasons of outdoor summer Shakespeare to hit the grass; in fact, The Taming of the Shrew was the first Shakespeare play she directed, back in the 1990’s.  Susanna was first exposed to First Folio text techniques through work as a theatre practitioner with the Seattle Shakespeare Company.  

Wed 14 Feb

Start time: 13:30


Tickets for students/staff: 12
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 16:30

Shakespeare Simplified: First Folio Text Techniques for Actors

Presented by: Susanna Wilson
Location: TS1 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Second Workshop: Females Only

Let Shakespeare’s First Folio help you ‘Speak the speech… trippingly on the tongue.’
The First Folio is as close as one can get to what Shakespeare originally wrote.  Editors have since made changes in punctuation and spelling to “modernise” the text, even breaking prose into poetry and/or poetry into prose.  Because Shakespeare’s plays are meant to be spoken and heard, not silently read, the original text includes performance clues such as tempo, pace, stressed words, and more.  Using First Folio Technique removes any confusion or intimidation these words may hold for the actor.

As part of a practical research investigation into creating gender identity through Shakespeare’s text, participants will be divided into two groups, one male, one female; each group will explore text spoken by both female and male characters in Shakespeare’s plays.  Actors will learn the fundamentals of First Folio Technique through group and individual exercises, with the opportunity to investigate further into one particular play, The Taming of the Shrew.

Bio:  Susanna Wilson began her professional theatre career in Seattle, Washington more than twenty-five years ago.  As a director, adapter, and producer, Susanna has been instrumental in bringing more than 30 works to the stage for multiple companies in the United States, including Book-It Repertory Theatre (a ‘page-to-stage’ company), Seattle Public Theatre, ArtsWest Playhouse, Theater Schmeater, and others.  From 2008 – 2010, Susanna served as the Artistic Director of SecondStory Repertory Theatre in Redmond, Washington.  She has helped nine seasons of outdoor summer Shakespeare to hit the grass; in fact, The Taming of the Shrew was the first Shakespeare play she directed, back in the 1990’s.  Susanna was first exposed to First Folio text techniques through work as a theatre practitioner with the Seattle Shakespeare Company.  

Wed 21 Feb

Start time: 14:00


Tickets for students/staff: 7
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available

Playing Together: Choreography, Rhythm, Ensemble and Storytelling

Presented by: Dan Canham
Location: TS1 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Having previously worked for DV8, Punchdrunk, Fabulous Beast and Kneehigh, Dan Canham now runs his own company Still House. Still House makes theatre that responds to real places and people and often using dance to bring the poetic out of the everyday and concrete.  A Bristol-based theatre-maker and a Drama graduate of the University of Exeter, Dan is returning to the department to share his processes and experiences with you in a practical workshop using movement and dance to look: rhythm, ensemble work, sensitivity, visual storytelling and a sense of play and shared discovery. Dan works a lot with choreography and thinks of it is merely as opportunities for playing together in the moment - this workshop will reflect that. There will also be opportunity to discuss running your own performance company, movement directing or other questions that might arise from the workshop.

Dan Canham is a contemporary performance maker and choreographer. Through his company, Still House, he makes socially engaged and visually poetic work that includes dance-theatre, film and installation.  Still House works, 30 Cecil Street and Ours Was the Fen Country have toured extensively throughout the UK and internationally. His latest work Of Riders and Running Horses is an outdoor dance event for a group of female dancers, a live band and an audience. Commissioned by Dance Umbrella, it opened Dance Umbrella 2016 and has played across Europe including the National Theatre, Tanec Praha and the Tbilisi Theatre Festival. As a movement director his credits include The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe (WYP/Elliot-Harper Productions) Peter Pan (National Theatre) Jane Eyre (National Theatre/Bristol Old Vic) Romeo + Juliet (Rose Theatre Kingston) 101 Dalmatians (Tobacco Factory Theatres), Shooting with Light (Idle Motion) Once Upon a Time (Aga Blonksa) Solo two (Tassos Stevens). www.stillhouse.co.uk

Wed 28 Feb

Start time: 13:30


Tickets for students/staff: 18
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 16:30

Shakespeare Simplified: First Folio Text Techniques for Actors

Presented by: Susanna Wilson
Location: TS1 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Third Workshop: All Welcome

Let Shakespeare’s First Folio help you ‘Speak the speech… trippingly on the tongue.’
The First Folio is as close as one can get to what Shakespeare originally wrote.  Editors have since made changes in punctuation and spelling to “modernise” the text, even breaking prose into poetry and/or poetry into prose.  Because Shakespeare’s plays are meant to be spoken and heard, not silently read, the original text includes performance clues such as tempo, pace, stressed words, and more.  Using First Folio Technique removes any confusion or intimidation these words may hold for the actor.

As part of a practical research investigation into creating gender identity through Shakespeare’s text, participants will be divided into two groups, one male, one female; each group will explore text spoken by both female and male characters in Shakespeare’s plays.  Actors will learn the fundamentals of First Folio Technique through group and individual exercises, with the opportunity to investigate further into one particular play, The Taming of the Shrew.

Bio:  Susanna Wilson began her professional theatre career in Seattle, Washington more than twenty-five years ago.  As a director, adapter, and producer, Susanna has been instrumental in bringing more than 30 works to the stage for multiple companies in the United States, including Book-It Repertory Theatre (a ‘page-to-stage’ company), Seattle Public Theatre, ArtsWest Playhouse, Theater Schmeater, and others.  From 2008 – 2010, Susanna served as the Artistic Director of SecondStory Repertory Theatre in Redmond, Washington.  She has helped nine seasons of outdoor summer Shakespeare to hit the grass; in fact, The Taming of the Shrew was the first Shakespeare play she directed, back in the 1990’s.  Susanna was first exposed to First Folio text techniques through work as a theatre practitioner with the Seattle Shakespeare Company.  

Wed 28 Feb

Start time: 16:00


Tickets for students/staff: 26
Tickets for public: 10
Admission Free
End Time: 17:30

Research Seminar: Carl Lavery - Theatre and Anthropocene Disorder

Location: TS1 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Numerous commentators (Clark, Ghosh, Cohen, Colebrook) have suggested that we are living in a time of Anthropocene disorder, an époque when humanist narratives and temporalities have been shattered, and where accepted modes of representation are unable to depict the new reality or disturbing stratigraphies in which we live. If we are suspicious, as I am, about the redemptive potential of certain forms of vital materialism, then how might theatre, the humanist art form par excellence, attempt to respond to this disturbance of scale, this return of an agentic, volatile, inhuman earth? This paper will explore this question by focusing on what I perceive to be the contradictions and limitations of 'the cli-fi play', a body of work that emerged in the UK in the late 2000s, before offering a tentative reading of Alistair McDowell's play X (2016), a work that I posit as a 'terrestrial event'.

Bio
Carl Lavery is Professor of Theatre and Performance at the University of Glasgow. His recent publications include, Rethinking the Theatre of the Absurd: Ecology, Environment and the Greening of the Modern Stage (2015) and a special issue of the journal Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism, 'Performance and Ecology: What Can Theatre Do'? The latter will be re-issued in book form by Routledge in December 2017. He is currently working on a new project Theatre and the Earth: Interrogating the Human.