Current events

The events below are organised by the College of Humanities. You may also be interested in events in the general University of Exeter events.

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20 November 201910:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: Visual AI and the Digital Humanities: practical approaches

Sign up required. Computer vision is perhaps AI’s most visible success story. This hands-on workshop will show attendees how to use free and open-source software to search, classify, compare and annotate large collections of images. Online demos and datasets will be provided, but attendees are encouraged to bring their own images. The workshop will be followed by a seminar discussing the state of the art in computer vision within DH, and exploring critical and ethical issues around such controversial technologies as facial recognition. Full details
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20 November 201914:00

Monica Hellstrom (Durham): Celebrating conversion: Gold-glass bowls and baptism in the late 4th century

TBC. Full details
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20 November 201915:30

CEMS: Paddy Bullard (Reading): What Book History tells us about Eighteenth-Century Georgic

Centre for Early Modern Studies Research Seminar. Full details
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20 November 201916:00

English: The Forgotten Language of the Medieval Church

Prof. Helen Gittos tells us about her recent research on the intersections of liturgy and the vernacular in medieval England before the Reformation. Full details
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20 November 201916:00

Digital Humanities Seminar: Visual AI & the Digital Humanities: critical and ethical issues

Digital Humanities Lab seminar series. Dr Giles Bergel (University of Oxford) & University of Exeter Art History and Visual Culture: "Visual AI & the Digital Humanities: critical and ethical issues". Join us for drinks and nibbles following the paper!. Full details
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20 November 201916:00

Gandhi’s Women Satyagrahis: Why do they matter in studying contemporary social-political trends?

Dr Meenal Shrivastava, author of Amma's Daughters (Athabasca University Press, 2018) will talk about her research into women activists associated with Gandhian mass anti-colonial movement in India. Full details
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21 November 201915:30

Dead Important: Archaeological answers to modern issues.

Professor Naomi Sykes, who is a specialist in Zooarchaeology; Human-Animal-Environment Interactions; Biomolecular Archaeology, will be speaking about the very important links between the past and the present. Full details
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22 November 201910:30

FULLY BOOKED - Digital Humanities Workshop: Introduction to Text Analysis with R

Sign up required. This workshop will introduce methods of computational text analysis with the R programming language. Text analysis uses computer programs to process and manipulate textual datasets large and small, and to visualise various aspects of language, including linguistics calculations, stylistic analysis, and network connections. The workshop is intended for humanists at varied levels of expertise, emphasising practical approaches and the interpretive questions arising from such work. How can text analysis enhance literary criticism? How can it be used to understand broad historical trends? The method of instruction will involve well-curated, commented R code notebooks in RStudio, an integrated development environment that aids R training. By the end of the workshop, attendees will have a basic understanding of R and a roadmap for the various routes that text analysis research can take. Full details
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25 November 201918:15

Sathnam Sanghera in conversation with Narinder Minhas

The College of Humanities is proud to present a Creative Dialogue between executive producer and creative director of Sugar Films Narinder Minhas (an Exeter alumnus), and journalist, author and TV presenter Sathnam Sanghera.. Full details
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27 November 201910:30

CANCELLED - Digital Humanities Workshop: How to Write a Data Management Plan

Sign up required. The aim of these workshops is to demystify the Data Management Plan and give you the skills to approach this area of your bid with confidence. Though each bid and DMP is unique, there are common elements and a degree of formula that can be learned, so most DMPs do not need to be written entirely from scratch. We would encourage any academic in HUMS to attend a workshop, even if you do not have an AHRC bid in progress, as they cover transferable content on best practices when working with data. All sessions will run in Digital Humanities Lab Seminar Room 1. Full details
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27 November 201912:30

Lunchtime Seminar: Andrew Rudd on Charity and Anti-Charity in Late Eighteenth-Century Britain and Niall Allsop on Contingency and Consent: Restoration Heroic Drama and the Historical Imagination

Andrew will speak on “Charity and Anti-Charity in Late Eighteenth-Century Britain”, and Niall on "Contingency and Consent: Restoration Heroic Drama and the Historical Imagination”. Full details
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27 November 201915:00

Centre for Medical History Seminar Series

Dr Kit Heyam (University of Plymouth), Lois Stone (University of Manchester), Dr Emma Vickers (Liverpool John Moores University). Full details
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27 November 201915:30

Translating, publishing and illustrating an Italian masterpiece: The many French lives of 'The Betrothed' (1827) by Alessandro Manzoni

The paper will analyse the context in which Manzoni’s novel The Betrothed (1827) was made available to the French public, from the first two rival versions in 1828 to the countless shortened and revised editions published throughout the century and up to the 1960s; these successive versions played a major role in conveying a distorted image of The Betrothed, reducing a complex and pessimistic novel to a naive edifying story meant for a Catholic audience and/or for young readers. Such a shift in interpretation can still be felt today in Manzoni’s reception in France – and not only in France. The special case of Manzoni’s novel therefore sheds light on the way implicit or explicit ideological and commercial strategies can take precedence over linguistic and literary concerns. While this paper will include occasional comparisons between the source text (Italian) and the target text (French), it will focus mostly on the context and para-text, including prefaces and images. Full details
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28 November 201915:00

Rachael Bundy (Exeter): 'Teach sad Philomel a louder note’: intersectional responses to Ovid in the long eighteenth century

TBC. Full details
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28 November 201915:30

TAB Intl development and climate change in the Andes

Susan Conlon, from Bristol University will be speaking about her work. Full details
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28 November 201915:30

English Visiting Speaker: Merve Emre (University of Oxford) - 20/21stC visiting speaker

Merve Emre Associate Professor of American Literature at the University of Oxford, and author of Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017); and The Personality Brokers (New York: Doubleday, 2018). Her talk is titled “Too Close Reading from Austen to Davis”.. Full details
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3 December 201914:30

FULLY BOOKED - Digital Humanities Workshop: Archival Photography

Sign up required. Archives are not ideal places to take photographs, with low light, sensitivity to noise and flashlight, and often no means of supporting a camera or your subject effectively. This course will guide you through the pitfalls and problems, and provide advice on taking sharp, clear photographs of your primary sources, without annoying your archivist.. Full details
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4 December 201915:30

Work In Progress at the Centre for Early Modern Studies

New members of CEMS will introduce their research interests. Speakers: Chris Ewers (English), Rethinking temporality in the long eighteenth century. Meredith Hale (Art History and Visual Culture), The Geography of Satire. Elin Jones (History), Passages of Time: Maritime Temporality and the Royal Navy, 1750 – 1850.. Full details
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4 December 201916:00

Dr Rebecca Williams: Bodies of Democracy: Population Control, “Unmet Needs”, and Rule by Consent in Post-1947 India

Dr Rebecca Williams (University of Exeter) will speak about her current research project on population control in post-colonial India. Full details
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4 December 201916:00

POSTPONED - Digital Humanities Seminar: For Everyone: the Participatory Archive

Digital Humanities Lab seminar series. Pip Willcox (The National Archives): "For Everyone: the Participatory Archive". Join us for drinks and nibbles following the paper!. Full details
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4 December 201918:00

Barton Lecture: Writing the History of the Sultan Saladin

This year's Simon Barton Memorial Lecture is being given by Prof. Jonathan Phillips, one of the UK's leading experts on the Crusades. He has published major works on the Second and Fourth Crusades, and is currently writing a new history of the Third. He is also well known to the public through his various appearances on TV and radio. This talk draws on his recently published book 'The Life and Legend of the Sultan Saladin' (Yale, 2019) and pays tribute to Simon Barton's work on Islam and Spain. Full details
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5 December 201915:30

Archaeology and Soil Security: Past and future rubbish

Elizabeth Graham from the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, will be speaking. Full details
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5 December 201915:30

Department of English Visiting Speaker: Hugh Dunkerley (University of Chichester) - CW visiting speaker

Department of English Visiting Speaker: Hugh Dunkerley (University of Chichester) - CW visiting speaker. Full details
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6 - 7 December 2019

Technological Animation in Classical Antiquity

Supported by the Leventis Foundation. The conference aims to bring together scholars from the fields of ancient technology, philosophy, archaeology and art. Specifically, the conference focuses on the living/moving artifact and the synesthetic experience that it might offer, as the outcome of a technological procedure that exempts it from its association with illusion and artifice.. Full details
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11 December 201914:00

Emily Gowers (Cambridge): Are trees really like people?

See Further Details for abstract. Full details
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11 December 201915:30

Work in progress (1)

a) Aidan Coveney & Laurie Dekhissi (Université de Poitiers) : Variation between qu’est-ce que & pourquoi in Conflictual Rhetorical Questions in French. b) Benjamin Shears (PhD Student in French and English Literature) Education in the novels of Samuel Richardson and Voltaire’s contes philosophiques.. Full details
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11 December 201916:30

Denial and Decolonization: Britain and the afterlives of Indian rule: Dr Yasmin Khan, University of Oxford

Denial and Decolonization: Britain and the afterlives of Indian rule: Dr Yasmin Khan, University of Oxford. Full details
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21 January 202013:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: How to Write a Data Management Plan

Sign up required. The aim of these workshops is to demystify the Data Management Plan and give you the skills to approach this area of your bid with confidence. Though each bid and DMP is unique, there are common elements and a degree of formula that can be learned, so most DMPs do not need to be written entirely from scratch. We would encourage any academic in HUMS to attend a workshop, even if you do not have an AHRC bid in progress, as they cover transferable content on best practices when working with data. All sessions will run in Digital Humanities Lab Seminar Room 1. Full details
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22 January 202015:00

Centre for Medical History Seminar Series

Hannes Hacke (Humboldt), Dr. Camilla Smith (Birmingham), Ty Vanover (Berkeley). Full details
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22 January 202015:30

'Content matters less than shape': Anthony Burgess, Giuseppe Gioachino Belli, John Keats

In ABBA ABBA (1977), Anthony Burgess effectively uses the biographical novel as a way of presenting his own highly original verse translations of a nineteenth-century Italian poet. Set in papal Rome in the winter of 1820/21, Part One of the book charts a fictional meeting between the consumptive John Keats and his Roman contemporary, the sonneteer Giuseppe Gioachino Belli; Part Two showcases 71 inventive versions of Belli’s sonnets in what Burgess misleadingly calls English with a Manchester accent. Reflecting on his hybrid novel in an essay entitled ‘Is Translation Possible?’, Burgess remarked that ‘Translation is […] transformation’. My recent edition of the text for the collected Irwell series proves that a) Burgess was initially concerned merely with translating Belli; and b) that Burgess worked collaboratively on these translations. Why, then, go to such lengths to publish them in this creative format? Why juxtapose Italian and English literary cultures at all?. Full details
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22 January 202016:00

Some Initial Thoughts about Understanding the Psychology of the Medieval Combatant

Dr Rob Jones completed his PhD on medieval military display at Cardiff. He currently works for Advanced Studies in England, which offers study abroad programmes for students from the US. His talk will discuss the pyschology of combat and will draw on recent research and, no doubt, his own experiences with medieval weaponry. Full details
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23 January 202010:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: Introduction to Digital Editing

Sign up required. The workshop is intended for staff and postgraduates who are interested in learning digital editing skills. We will provide hands-on experience of the basics of TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) XML, a standard that is widely used to encode primary source texts for critical editions and digital text resources. No prior experience is necessary. Full details
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5 February 202015:30

European Cinemas of Girlhood

tbc. Full details
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19 February 202015:30

Work in progress (2)

Jonathan Bradbury, ‘The drawbacks to women bathing in rivers in early-modern Spain; or, the public versus the private’. Full details
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19 February 202016:00

Employment in the Heritage Sector

Nick Holder is Senior Properties Historian at English Heritage and an Honorary Research Associate at Exeter. In this talk, he will discuss employment opportunities for historians in the heritage sector, and highlight some of the skills and experiences that are needed to pursue careers in this area. Full details
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4 March 202012:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: Digital Editing guided practice

Sign up required. This workshop is intended for staff and postgraduates who have attended the Introduction to Digital Editing course, or who have some existing text encoding experience. We will explore more advanced areas of TEI in detail, providing the opportunity for plenty of hands-on experience and discussion. Full details
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4 March 202016:00

Working title: Medieval Maritime

Prof. Sebastian Sobecki will talk on an aspect of medieval maritime history. Full details
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18 March 202015:30

Work in progress (3)

tbc. Full details
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25 March 2020

The Wreck of Warren Hastings: Salvage, Weather and Insurance in the Indian Ocean

Dr Debjani Bhattacharyya will speak on her work related to the history of the Indian Ocean. Full details
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25 March 202018:00

Orme Lecture

This year's annual Orme Lecture will be given by Prof. Elisabeth van Houts. Full details
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6 April 20209:00

Popular Visual Media and the Bible

This conference aims to explore the varied relationships between biblical texts and contemporary popular visual media such as sci-fi or fantasy films and TV shows, comic books and video games. Traditionally considered ‘low culture’, such media have received an upsurge in popularity over the last decade and have become a major source of social commentary and individual expression, especially in relation to religious texts such as the Bible. We welcome scholarly analyses of any aspect of popular visual culture and biblical texts (including non-canonical texts). The conference will take place at the University of Exeter on Monday 6th April 2020. Please send abstracts (200-300 words) and a short bio to Dr Rebekah Welton at r.c.welton@exeter.ac.uk and Dr Zanne Domoney-Lyttle at zanne.domoney-lyttle@glasgow.ac.uk, no later than December 31st, 2019. For more information, please contact the organisers. Full details
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29 April 202016:00

The Birgittine Brothers of Syon Abbey: Patterns of Vocation Revealed by the Syon Martiloge and Other Records of their Lives, c. 1415-1600

Dr Virginia Bainbridge, an Honorary Research Associate at Exeter, will discuss her recent research on the monks of Syon Abbey during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. This talk draws on the manuscripts and archives from the 'Syon Abbey Collection' which is held by the University Library. Full details
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6 May 202015:30

Work in progress (4)

tbc. Full details
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13 May 202015:00

Workshop on Sex and Infertility

This workshop is co-hosted with the Centre for Medical History. Dr Zubin Mistry will talk about his research into childlessness in early medieval societies. Full details
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13 May 202015:00

Centre for Medical History Seminar Series

Joint seminar with the Centre for Medieval History. Confirmed speakers are Dr. Zubin Mistry (Edinburgh). Further details tba.. Full details
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20 May 202015:30

Piecing Together the Fragments

‘Piecing Together the Fragments’: Jo Balmer is an acclaimed poet, known for her ‘transgressions’ – translations of ancient literary texts, which go beyond translations in order to accommodate personal reflections and autobiographical moments. More recently she has expanded the field of ‘texts’ which inspire her poetry to include non-literary works such as dictionaries, headstones furniture. In a recent volume of poetry – Letting Go – she turns to ancient authors, such as Thucydides, Livy, Virgil and Hesiod – to explore and articulate her grief at losing her mother. Full details
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21 May 202010:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: How to Write a Data Management Plan

Sign up required. The aim of these workshops is to demystify the Data Management Plan and give you the skills to approach this area of your bid with confidence. Though each bid and DMP is unique, there are common elements and a degree of formula that can be learned, so most DMPs do not need to be written entirely from scratch. We would encourage any academic in HUMS to attend a workshop, even if you do not have an AHRC bid in progress, as they cover transferable content on best practices when working with data. All sessions will run in Digital Humanities Lab Seminar Room 1. Full details
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3 June 202015:30

The notion of happiness - across centuries, cultures and media (Round Table)

1) Early Modern Happiness and Gardens between Britain and China 2) Enlightenment Happiness and the Literary Imagination in Germany and Spain 3) Modern Happiness and Housing between Austria and Britain. Full details
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