Photo of Dr Vivienne Xiangwei Guo

Dr Vivienne Xiangwei Guo

Lecturer in Modern Chinese History

4289

01392 724289

Before I conducted my PhD research in modern Chinese history at King’s College London, I had studied international politics at Peking University, China and Waseda University, Japan and then obtained my MSc in international relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Between 2014 and 2016, I worked as a research associate at the University of Cologne, Germany and taught four courses in modern Chinese history. I joined the University of Exeter in September 2016.

My research interests primarily lie in the social and political history of the Second Sino-Japanese War and the extended civil conflicts in the Republican Era, and the history of Chinese political networks, societies and groups in the late nineteenth century and the twentieth century. I am interested more widely in Chinese intellectual and gender histories, in particular the circulation of ideas and movements in a global context. 

Research interests

My research interests primarily lie in the social and political history of the Second Sino-Japanese War and the extended civil conflicts in the Republican Era, and the history of Chinese political networks, societies and groups in the late nineteenth century and the twentieth century. I am interested more widely in Chinese intellectual and gender histories, in particular the circulation of ideas and movements in a global context.

Supported by the King’s China Institute PhD Studentship, I completed my PhD study on Chinese women intellectuals’ cross-party political networks during the wartime era (1937-1949). I am currently revising my thesis into a book-length monograph entitled: Across the Geo-Political Borders: Women Intellectuals’ Political Networks in Wartime China for publication.

My current research investigates the transnational interactions of political ideas, movements and institutions engaging both Chinese warlords and intellectuals in the controversially defined “warlord era” (1916-1928). This project aims to challenge the teleological narratives of the ‘anti-warlordism, anti-imperialism’ National Revolution sustained by both the Nationalist Party and the Communist Party, and therefore to re-interpret the processes of Chinese nation-building in the context of globalisation after the Great War. This project provides a crucial ‘Chinese perspective’ to deepen the understanding of transnational history in the inter-war period. 

External impact and engagement

Between 2009 and 2011, working as a freelance journalist for the BBC World Service, I have engaged in the translation and publication of news features in Chinese politics, culture, economy, military and foreign affairs. I also carried out a six-month China project for the Grimstone Foundation in 2010 and drafted a Guidebook of Shanghai to provide British investors with a particular view of China’s history, politics, economy and culture.

Teaching

  • Special Subject: China’s Intellectual Elites – Ideas and Networks, 1860s-1960s (Year 3)
  • Undergraduate dissertation supervision (Year 3)
  • Uses of the Past (Year 2)
  • Doing History (Year 2)
  • Sources and Skills: Women and Modern China (Year 1)
  • Understanding the Modern World (Year 1, 2016-2017)