Current events

The events below are organised by the College of Humanities. You may also be interested in events in the general University of Exeter events.

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24 October 201815:30

The Birth of Brazilian Amazonian Societies, Prof. Mark Harris (St Andrews)

The Exeter Centre for Latin American Studies first seminar of the year will be delivered by Mark Harris, Professor of Historical Anthropology at the University of St Andrews. Full details
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8 November 201817:30

When the Mediterranean Moved West: Pathways of Catalan Emigration in the Americas

Thomas Harrington is Professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford (USA), where he offers classes on contemporary Iberian literature, cinema, and cultural history. His main lines of research are recent Peninsular movements of national identity, Iberianism, Contemporary Catalan culture, cultural theory (especially Polysystems Theory), and the migrations between the so-called peripheral cultures of the Peninsula and the societies of the Caribbean and the Southern Cone. He is the recipient of two Fulbright scholarships, and the Batista i Roca prize for his work in disseminating Catalan culture in the world. In addition to his academic work in Hispanic Studies, he is a frequent commentator on politics and culture in the US press and a number of Spanish- and Catalan-language media outlets. Full details
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21 November 201816:00

My Hovercraft is Full of Eels: Medieval History in the Media

Kate Wiles, an expert in Old English manuscripts and Senior Editor at History Today, offers some insights into the way medieval history is - and ought to be - presented in the media.. Full details
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21 November 201816:00

DH Seminar: Artificial Intelligence in Archives: Handwritten Text Recognition with Transkribus

Digital Humanities Lab seminar series. Dr Louise Seaward (UCL): ‘Artificial Intelligence in Archives: Handwritten Text Recognition with Transkribus’. Join us for drinks and nibbles following the paper!. Full details
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21 November 201816:30

Prof. Leif Isaksen (Exeter) - "The Ends of the Earth: the western section of the Peutinger Map and implications for its origin"

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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26 November 201810:00

Video production for research and documentary (beginners)

The Digital Humanities Lab is offering University of Exeter College of Humanities students and staff the opportunity to attend Video production training for research and documentary. Full details
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27 November 201816:30

'Deconstruir' los mitos de la independencia sudamericana, Inés Quintero and Rogelio Altez (Venezuela)

EXCELAS Seminar with Inés Quintero and Rogelio Altez from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Please note that this seminar will be delivered in Spanish.. Full details
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28 November 201810:30

Digital Humanities Workshop: Text Encoding in TEI XML for Intermediates

The TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) standard is widely used to encode primary source texts for critical editions and web archives and resources, allowing editorial and descriptive features to be captured for preservation, display and analysis. This intermediate hands-on training will look in greater depth at using TEI to encode textual materials, for those who have already had some exposure to TEI or attended our Text Encoding for Beginners workshop. The workshop is intended for Exeter staff and postgraduates who are involved in text encoding projects or who are interested in gaining these skills. Full details
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28 November 201816:30

Prof. Tim Whitmarsh (Cambridge) - "The Invention of White? Skin Colour in Ancient Greece"

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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4 December 201814:00

WCCEH Seminar: Weight Stigma - Is the War on Obesity making us sick?

Could it be that everything we think we know about fat and health is wrong? Where did these ideas come from? And what does this mean for individuals, for healthcare professionals, and for policy makers? In this seminar, we will look at the evidence-base for the weight-health relationship and consider whether current weight-focussed public health policy may be doing more harm than good. Is feeling bad about our bodies worse for us than actually being fat? Are we helping anybody by demonising fat? And what should we be doing instead? In this seminar, we’ll consider alternative explanations for what we think we know, and look at what that might mean going forward. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion and for everyone to bring their own lived experiences, whether as a patient, a carer, or both. We hope to inspire you to reconsider your own notions of health, wellbeing, and human dignity. And who knows, maybe start a revolution. Who is this seminar for? People with a body (any size or shape); people who know people with a body (any size or shape); members of the public; health practitioners, therapists, body workers, fitness professionals; policy makers; educators; students; parents, non-parents; anyone who thinks it sounds interesting! Refreshments from 1:30pm Speakers: Lucy Aphramor has worked as an NHS community dietitian, a specialist cardiac dietitian, run a social enterprise, and a freelance trainer and performance artist, among other things. She has been involved in creating national and international guidelines and best practice, is a respected scholar on critical dietetics and issues of ethics in public health, and an avid social justice advocate. Her journey has taken her from the establishment and into the community, and she is passionate about engagement and co-creation of knowledge. Angela Meadows is an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology at the University of Exeter. Her main focus is on how societal weight stigma influences higher-weight individuals; who, why, and when people turn these negative attitudes on themselves, and how this affects their health and wellbeing. And what happens when we resist being devalued by society. She is also a blogger and a fat acceptance activist and is often invited to speak in the media on the subject of weight, health, and stigma.. Full details
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4 December 201817:30

Simon Barton Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies: Faith, Culture and Identity in Medieval Spain

In December 2017 we lost a much-loved and respected former colleague, Prof. Simon Barton. A year on, we have chosen to celebrate his memory and his work by asking Roger Collins, a prominent historian of medieval Spain, to give a lecture in his honour. It is hoped that this will become an annual fixture on the medieval calendar at Exeter. We are grateful to Prof. Nicholas Orme for his generous support for this event.. Full details
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5 December 201816:00

DH Seminar: The Case for Slow Digitisation

Digital Humanities Lab seminar series. Professor Andrew Prescott (Glasgow): ‘The Case for Slow Digitisation’. Join us for drinks and nibbles following the paper!. Full details
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5 December 201817:30

Professor Karen ni Mheallaigh Inaugural Lecture: Lunar exploration in the ancient world

50 years ago this July, the first human set foot on the Moon. This paper explores the fascinating history of imaginative and scientific lunar exploration in the world before telescope, stretching back 2,500 years into the ancient Greek past. Full details
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12 December 201817:00

CA Lecture: Dr Kathryn Tempest (Roehampton) "The Art of Faking It: The Letters of Marcus Brutus and Mithridates"

CA Lecture at Exeter College. The writing of fake letters was widely practiced in antiquity. But how and why did the pseudepigrapher go about his work? To answer such a question, this paper focuses on the letters attributed in antiquity to Marcus Brutus, all of which purport to come from the period 43-42 BC, when the Liberators were preparing for war against the joint forces of Mark Antony and Octavian. In this connection, attention will be paid to the Greek letters of Brutus: a collection of seventy short letters, thirty-five of them allegedly written by the tyrannicide, as he issued demands for resources in the province of Asia and within Lycia. Although they were admired in antiquity for their brevity and forcefulness, modern discussions have focused instead on issues of authenticity and authorship. Erasmus first doubted Brutus’ authorship of the Greek letters in 1520 (see Achelis 1917/18); this speculation was further fuelled by the celebrated dissertation of Bentley (1697), who illuminated the authorial practice of impersonating great figures from antiquity. Although Bentley was concerned with the letters of Phalaris, and not Brutus, the implications of his findings were vast. While some scholars have defended the attribution of the letters to Brutus (Rühl 1915; Goukowsky 2011; Jones 2015), historical errors and inconsistencies have led others to dismiss the collection as a forgery, either in full (Marcks 1883; Rawson 1986; Moles 1997) or in part (Westermann 1851; Smith 1936; Torraco 1959). It is perhaps unfortunate that previous scholarship has focused almost exclusively on the question of Brutus’ real or feigned authorship; that is, on one half of the collection only. For, as I discuss in this paper, an introductory letter written by the compiler of the collection – an otherwise unidentified Mithridates – explains that he personally composed the other thirty-five letters as imaginary responses, because his nephew had wanted to know how the cities might have replied to Brutus’ repeated demands for money and military support. This explanation of the collection’s didactic function, I argue, coupled with a close examination of the contents of the letters does much to reveal their interest in rhetorical argumentation, and especially the dilemma form. But the cover letter of Mithridates also does something more than that; in reflecting on the art of composing his replies, the author takes his reader into the world of the fake letter writer, where he presents his work as both a scholar and a creative artist. Full details
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13 December 201814:30

Exploring Capitalism. Historical Archaeology and Heritage of the Modern Expansion into Antarctica, Ximena Senatore (CONICET)

Seminar co-organised by Archaeology and EXCELAS. Dr. Ximena Senatore is a researcher at CONICET (Argentina) and member of ICOMOS International Polar Heritage Committee.. Full details
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9 January 201913:00

Introduction to R for Social Scientists

This workshop is aimed at those who have no experience of R, and will provide a solid introduction to using it for data analysis by covering how to handle data structures such as vectors, matrices, and data frames. Full details
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17 January 201917:00

CA Lecture: Máirín O’Hagan (Barefaced Greek Productions) "Barefaced Greek"

CA Lecture at Exeter College. 4 short films + Q&A. Full details
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30 January 201916:30

Dr Kathryn Stevens (Durham) - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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13 February 201916:30

Prof. Hans Van Wees (KCL) - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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20 February 201916:30

Prof. Martin Revermann - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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27 February 201916:30

Dr Jeroen Wijnendaele (Ghent) - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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28 February 201915:00

Sex, Sexuality and Classical Reception

This event brings together early career researchers studying how the history of sex and sexuality intersects with the reception of the ancient world in the 19th and 20th centuries. Full details
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11 March 201917:30

Annual Orme Lecture: Prof. Miri Rubin (Title TBC)

The Annual Orme Lecture will be given by Prof. Miri Rubin. We are grateful for the generous support of Nicholas Orme for this event. Full details
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20 March 201917:00

CA Lecture: Prof. Greg Woolf (ICS) - TBC

CA Lecture, Exeter College. Full details
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27 March 201916:30

Prof. Catherine M. Connors (Washington) "Notes from underground: Geology and Revelation in Heliodorus’ Aethiopica"

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. In his expansive and adventurous novel the Aethiopica, Heliodorus makes extensive use of vocabulary and motifs of geological and geographical discourse about rivers, caves and other natural features. Ancient discussions of geology and geography preserved in Strabo, Seneca’s Natural Questions, and elsewhere consider how the visible world is related to and shaped by physical processes that are not always visible to an observer’s eye, and this kind of thinking is a robust part of discussions of the underworld in antiquity. Heliodorus’ extensive use of geological and geographical knowledge throughout his narrative invites readers to measure the analytical techniques developed for thinking about the relation of the visible to the invisible against his own tale of concealment, death-defying ordeals, and revelation.. Full details
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1 May 201917:00

CA Lecture: Matt Bryden - "Lost and Found"

CA Lecture at Exeter College. Poetry reading + Q&A. Full details
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8 May 201916:30

Prof. Emily Gowers (Cambridge) - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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13 May 201916:30

Prof. Douglas Cairns (Edinburgh) - TBC

Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar. Full details
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