Dr Stacey Hynd

BA, MSt, D.Phil (Oxon)

Senior Lecturer

4323

01392 724323

My primary research interests are histories of law, crime and punishment in Africa, with my recent doctoral research being completed on capital punishment in British Africa through archival work in Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania. I also research criminal law in the British Empire and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.  I am interested more widely in African gender histories, violence and warfare in Africa, and in imperial and global history. My current research projects focus on histories of child combatants in modern African warfare, and the development of human rights and humanitarian discourses in West Africa, with a particular focus on Ghana.

Research interests

My main research interests are in the history of law, violence and punishment in Africa, particularly during the colonial period. My doctoral research focused on the use of the death penalty in Britain’s African colonies, using this to explore the nature of colonial rule, and attitudes to murder and criminality. I am currently working on revising my thesis, ‘Imperial Gallows: Capital Punishment, Violence and Colonial Rule in Britain’s African Territories, c.1908-68’ for publication. I have conducted archival research in Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Tanzania and Jamaica. I also research criminal law in the British Empire and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.  I am interested more widely in African gender histories, histories of youth and childhood,  violence and warfare in Africa, and in imperial and global history. My current British Academy/Leverhulme funded research project is on 'Children at War: A History of Child Combatants in Twentieth-Century Africa'. My other ongoing research project focuses on the development of human rights and humanitarian discourses in West Africa, with a particular focus on Ghana.

Research supervision

I am happy to supervise students in the fields of African history and imperial/global history, and in particular those with an interest in the following areas:

  • histories of law
  • crime and punishment
  • violence
  • conflict and warfare
  • transitional justice and post-war reconciliation
  • human rights
  • histories of global humanitarianism
  • gender
  • childhood and youth

 

Research students

I currently supervise four doctoral candidates, who are working on the the political mobilization of Acholi identity in Northern Uganda, 1960-85; gender histories of nineteenth-century Abeokuta, Nigeria; domestic violence in colonial Kenya, and the women's militant resistance to apartheid in South Africa.

Other information

Member of African Studies Association

Senior Member, Wolfson College Cambridge

Biography

I read for a BA in Modern History at Somerville College, University of Oxford, before going on to complete an MSt in Imperial and Commonwealth History at the same institution in 2003, where I wrote my dissertation on the Tanganyikan penal system, c.1920-45. After a year spent living in Egypt and Jamaica, I returned to Oxford where I completed my DPhil. in Modern History at St Cross College in 2008, where I was a Beit Research Scholar. My doctorate was written on the subject of capital punishment in British colonial Africa. I then spent a year lecturing in African and World History at the University of Cambridge, where I was a Fellow of Wolfson College, before arriving at Exeter in September 2008.