What's on

Drama performances, events and seminars are shown here. Please remember that coursework performances may not appear until a week before the performance, so please check back regularly. See also the Conferences page.

Scroll down the list below to find the event you'd like to make a reservation for.

Wed 18 Jan

Start time: 14:00

Admission Free
University tickets SOLD OUT
No public tickets available
End Time: 16:00


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after you've reserved!

Careers Workshop: The Casting Director

Presented by: Kevin Riddle Casting
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Casting the Roles: Daily Insights from a national casting director

The casting director is instrumental in the choice of actors cast for any given project (film, television, theatre).  Working closely with directors, producers, managers, agents and actors, the casting director has to have a comprehensive knowledge of the industry and an incisive understanding of the personal chemistries of collaboration.

In this afternoon informal discussion, Kevin Riddle (“Uncle”, “Misfits”, “Utopia”) will share experiences of the daily life of a casting director, his journey to establishing his own casting company, as well as wider industry insights.

IF you’ve ever wondered what goes on in the audition room, how one even gets there, or how to be a part of the team making the casting choices, this is your opportunity to find out.

Wed 08 Feb

Start time: 14:00


Tickets for students/staff: 21
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 16:00


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after you've reserved!

Careers Workshop: An Introduction to Producing

Presented by: Sarah Wilson-White
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Delivered by Sarah Wilson-White, this session will explore the role of the producer in contemporary theatre.
Including practical tasks on budgeting and marketing, the workshop will discuss the different routes to becoming a producer, the responsibilities of the role and the different ways to make producing a viable career.

Sarah is an independent producer and arts marketer working in London and South East England. Presently she is the producer for Farnham Maltings; and producer of Home Live Art and Jammy Voo. Alongside producing Sarah offers marketing support to a range of artists and companies, and is currently a visiting lecturer at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama. Previously Sarah was the producer for national touring ensemble Rhum and Clay, the marketing and engagement co-ordinator for touring initiative house, and creator of new digital touring resource tour-finder.org. She has provided marketing assistance to Makin Projects, Blind Summit Theatre and Camden People’s Theatre, and has produced projects for solo artist Rachel Mars and the Old Vic Theatre among others.

To date Sarah has had articles published in Guardian Culture Professionals, Arts Professional and Arts Industry. She was a recipient of the Edfringe Producer bursary in 2012, is a Clore emerging leaders Alumnus and a Trustee of the New Diorama Theatre in London.
sewtheatre.com | @se_wilson

Wed 22 Feb

Start time: 16:30


Tickets for students/staff: 29
Tickets for public: 20
Admission Free
End Time: 18:00

Research Seminar: Second Wave Practice Research

Presented by: Rachel Hann
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Second Wave Practice Research: Doing ‘effective sharing’
Practice-as-Research (PaR) has arguably entered a new phase of development and maturity. A second wave approach adopts the notions of ‘Practice Research’, which avoids the micro-politics of practice as/through/based/led and focuses on the wider issues related to how researchers share, apply and critique knowledge borne of practice. My argument for a second wave of practice research calls for a re-focusing on how this work is effectively shared with the discipline more broadly. Paradoxically, a consequence of the first wave is that practice research arguably now sustains a privileged position within our administrative structures: a position that can act to isolate these knowledge claims from the critical ecologies of peer review and long-term critique. As a researcher who undertook a PaR PhD, I am overtly aware that it is only in recent years that commitments have been made to offer sustainable platforms for non-conventional research outcomes. Yet, these (mostly online) platforms require sustainable and steady funding streams to ensure the long-term accessibility. Dead hyperlinks are an academic crime. This points to a second paradox of practice research and one that I confront as part of a second wave debate: that practice is ‘for the now’, both temporally and politically. Following by the declarations of Phelan (1993), the first wave of practice research focused on the fleeting temporality of knowledge epistemologies with little commitment to long-term critical ecologies. Practice research seems bound for a future of repeating itself, relying on verbal histories shared between academic generations. To paraphrase former REF Panel D Chair Bruce Brown, the argument for practice research has been won. My proposal for a second wave of practice research builds upon this administrative ‘win’ to re-orientate the debate towards the long-term accessibility of knowledge claims evidenced through practice.  

Biography
Dr. Rachel Hann is a Lecturer in Scenography at the University of Surrey. Rachel also holds the roles of Deputy Associate Dean for the Doctoral College, as well as Director of Postgraduate Research for the Guildford School of Acting (GSA). Rachel’s research is focused on the material cultures of costume, performance design, and architecture. In 2013, Rachel co-founded the biennial conference and exhibition Critical Costume. This initial event produced a co-edited special issue of Scene (Intellect) on costume practices. Critical Costume has now gone on to establish itself as an international research network with events in Helsinki and Prague (see criticalcostume.com). Rachel is currently in the process of writing a monograph entitled ‘Beyond Scenography’ for Routledge (due 2017). Since 2014, Rachel has been an Executive Officer for the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), having previously co-convened the Scenography working group (2010-2013). At the University of Leeds, Rachel’s PaR PhD thesis employed computer-based 3D visualization as a research method to investigate unrealized utopian theatre architecture (see utopiantheatres.co.uk).

Wed 15 Mar

Start time: 16:00


Tickets for students/staff: 26
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 17:30


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after you've reserved!

Careers Workshop: Writing for Theatre Criticism and Producing at the Fringe

Presented by: Mark Fisher
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

This is a unique chance to meet a Guardian theatre critic and freelance feature writer. Mark Fisher is the author of The Edinburgh Fringe Survival Guide and How to Write About Theatre: a manual for critics, students and bloggers. An active member of the Scottish theatre scene, Mark has decades of experience in producing theatre, interviewing theatre-makers, analyzing and critiquing theatre and publishing.

During this informal Q&A, you will have the opportunity to learn about the dos and don’ts of producing your own theatre at the Edinburgh Fringe and/or how to develop your own writing practice into freelance theatre criticism.