What's on

Drama performances, events and seminars are shown here. Please remember that coursework performances may not appear until a week before the performance, so please check back regularly. See also the Conferences page.

Scroll down the list below to find the event you'd like to make a reservation for.

Wed 12 Oct

Start time: 16:00


Tickets for students/staff: 34
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 17:30

Careers Workshop: Life as a Drama Teacher

Presented by: Joe Wyatt
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Many of our students consider becoming drama teachers after their degree.  Are you one of them?  This is your chance to hear about the job first hand. Come hear about the life of a drama teacher from Joe Wyatt, Head of Drama at St James secondary school, in Exeter.

In 2013, Joe completed the Devon SCITT teacher training programme based in Newton Abbot. This is one of the leading programmes that Exeter Drama students apply to, so Joe’s talk provides a wonderful opportunity to learn more about teacher training and this specific programme.

This informal chat will be an opportunity for you to hear firsthand about the life of a drama teacher as well as have many of your own questions answered.

Fri 14 Oct

Start time: 17:30


Tickets for students/staff: 22
Tickets for public: 19
Admission Free
End Time: 19:00

CREATING ALTERNATIVE PERFORMANCE WORK IN THE SPACES BETWEEN

Location: RS2 (Roborough Studios, Prince of Wales Road)

Aesthetics dramaturgies, and performance processes of The Llanarth Group's Told by the Wind and other work

Phillip Zarrilli with playwright/dramaturg, Kaite O’Reilly

This talk will serve as a prelude to the performance of Told by the Wind at the Exeter Northcott on Monday 17 October at 7:30p.m. The talk will begin with a discussion of the context and sources that inspired the co-creation of Told by the Wind. The talk will focus on the aesthetic and structural/dramaturgical principles that inform Japanese ‘phantasmal’ noh dramas, the ‘aesthetics of quietude’ associated with noh and the work of Ota Shogo, key concepts such as yugen and wabi sabi, as well as the notion of parallel universes from contemporary cosmology and astro-physics. Zarrilli will also briefly discuss the posychophysical training processes he uses to train actors that informs all the productions discussed.

Audio-visual images and video slips of productions will be shows to illustrate key points.

Award-winning playwright Kaite O’Reilly will address how her understanding of performance structures and dramaturgy have been inspired by ‘alternative’ and non-Western dramaturgies.

Video clips will include:

  • The Water Station: Zarrilli’s director of Japanese playwright/director Ota Shogo’s the Water Station with Nordland Teatre (Norway, 2015) with an international cast of ten, featuring two former Exeter MFA students.
  • playing ‘the maids’: a new performance co-created between The Llanarth Group, Gaitkrash (Ireland), Theatre P’yut (Korea) with independent artists Adrian Curtin, and four former Exeter students.
  • The Echo Chamber: the 2012 production co-created by Zarrilli, Kaite O’Reilly, Peader Kirk, and Ian Morgan.

Sat 15 Oct

Start time: 13:00


Tickets for students/staff: 23
Tickets for public: 28
Admission Free

Works in Progress - The Legacy of Phillip Zarrilli's Time at Exeter

Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

This one-day event celebrates the contribution of Phillip Zarrilli to the Drama Department at the University of Exeter, where he was Professor of Performance Practice between 2000 and 2013. Zarrilli is internationally known as a director, actor trainer, actor and author. He is the founding Artistic Director of The Llanarth Group. While at Exeter Zarrilli worked in the studio daily with BA and MA/MFA students, training them in the psychophysical actor-training process he developed over many years--always culminating in production work and/or creation of the student's own performances. At this event, former students will reflect on how the training has informed their artistic practice. Will Dickie will perform his solo piece Memories of Suburbia. Zarrilli will give a lecture on his current research, which concerns temporality in the 'work' and experience of the actor. Admission is free, but registration is required.

1pm - Tea & Coffee Reception

2pm - Opening Remarks and Lecture by Phillip Zarrilli

Temporality in the “work” and experience of the actor

This talk is an extract from my current sole-authored book-in-progress, (toward) a phenomenology of acting. I will reflect on and interrogate the nature and experience of temporality in the work and experience of the actor, addressing key questions such as the following:

What is our experience of ‘time’?
Is there a ‘time’ before ‘time’?
What differentiates ‘time-space’ from linear/clock time?
What does it mean and what is it like to be “in the present moment”…in the “here and now”?
How does the actor corporeally embody “time”?
Several video-clips of production work will illustrate key points.

3pm - Break

3.45pm - Roundtable: Phillip Zarrilli's influence in contemporary practice/research
Speakers: Alissa Clarke, Sol Garre, Rebecca Loukes, Duncan Jamieson, Tara McAllister-Viel, Victor Ramirez-Ladron, Emily Kreider

5pm - Open Discussion

5.45pm - Break

6pm - Performance by Will Dickie, Memories of Suburbia (30 mins)

6.45pm - Wine Reception

Wed 19 Oct

Start time: 16:00


Tickets for students/staff: 18
Tickets for public:
Admission Free
End Time: 18:00

Writing Workshop: Reading for Writers

Location: SR2

In this workshop we will look at how to get the best out of reading for your academic writing. We will discuss methods for reading academic texts, how to deal with difficult reading, how to approach note taking, how to know what to read, what to look for, how to select quotations and how to improve your style.

Wed 19 Oct

Start time: 16:30


Tickets for students/staff: 36
Tickets for public: 9
Admission Free
End Time: 18:00

Research Seminar - Love on the Dole: Politics and the Return of Community Theatre

Presented by: Sarah Weston in conversation with Dr Rebecca Hillman
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

In July 2016 Salford Community Theatre Project staged a promenade adaptation of Walter Greenwood’s novel Love on the Dole. The novel, set in 1930s Salford, depicts the effects of poverty, unemployment and exploitation on the lives of ordinary Salfordians, culminating in the National Unemployed Workers Movement’s demonstration of 1931, now known as the Battle of Bexley Square.  This talk will discuss the politics of the community play, and how this form allows both artists and community members, through the narratives of the past, to draw out the political tensions of the present. Following the development of ‘Applied Theatre’ as a form, and the turn away from the explicitly political community theatre of the 60s-80s, Weston will address how the community play offers a return to political theatre making, without abandoning some of the more celebratory and empowering aspects of current non-political applied practice. 

 

Bio: Sarah Weston is a theatre practitioner and playwright specializing in devised and community theatre. She is currently completing her doctoral studies through an examination of the relationship between performance and political voice for young people, both to what extend political voice is a performative act, as well as looking at the political efficacy of theatre practice regarding voice. 

Wed 02 Nov

Start time: 14:00


Tickets for students/staff: 38
Tickets for public: 0
Admission Free
No public tickets available
End Time: 15:30

Careers Event - Radio Matters

Presented by: Hedii Niklaus
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Come hear and experience the power of (your own) voice in this very special talk by veteran radio and voice actor Hedli Niklaus (The Archers).

In this talk, Hedli will share lessons from her acting experiences with especial emphasis on the reality of working in the BBC radio studio in Birmingham. Understanding the day to day work experience from the actors' point of view, Hedli will discuss spot effects and how they can go horribly wrong, problem fellow actors, tricky directors, poor scripts, and how to handle all of them.  Whatever the media, actors have to suspend disbelief and concentrate on an inner truth to discount the artificial environment in which they find themselves, and this workshop will give insight into just how to do that.  

Students will also be given the opportunity to handle and create scripts. Hedli will guide participants through the marking up of scripts, learning how to create background atmosphere for a scene, and discovering the challenge of writing the last five lines of a cliff-hanger.

Moreover, Hedli will also address larger career issues such as, ‘is it necessary to go to a drama school’, ‘what other avenues lead to work’, ‘are agents vital’, and ‘is networking useful’ and ‘what other jobs exist for voice artists’? 

This is an interactive session with an opportunity to ask questions at the end.

Wed 02 Nov

Start time: 16:30


Tickets for students/staff: 39
Tickets for public: 9
Admission Free
End Time: 18:00

Research Seminar - Too Much of Water

Presented by: Stephen Bottoms
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

More information coming soon

Wed 23 Nov

Start time: 16:30


Tickets for students/staff: 38
Tickets for public: 9
Admission Free
End Time: 18:00

Research Seminar - Technologized Animality: Performance beyond Humanity

Presented by: Jennifer Parker-Starbuck
Location: TS2 (Alexander Building, Thornlea, New North Rd.)

Examining cross-species performance encounters of ‘technologized animality’ (between humans, animals and technologies), this talk frames a ‘becoming-animate’ that takes place through ideas of representation, presentation, and dissention in performance. In an age described as the Anthropocene, the non-human animal figures crucially in political and ethical imaginings of any possible future, and this talk frames certain forms of techno-animality on what Ranciere calls a ‘political stage’ as a form of dissensus. Animals are frequently subsumed within hybridized/technologized practices, yet this talk argues that if considered as dissenting figures, animals might disrupt growing conflations between animals and technologies. Analysing the proliferation of performance engagements with animality, including: bio-technological experimentations, “dead” animals (a turn to taxidermy), robotic/technologized animals, living animals, and human-animal hybrids, this paper navigates a shifting terrain to foreground how animality is shaping human-centric performance practices and lives. In (Korean/US) artist Doo Sung Yoo’s animal-machine hybrids, specifically his robotic pig-heart jellyfish, “animals,” controlled by humans, are at their least “animal,” but it is this disturbance to form that provokes its possibility as dissenting agent in Anthropocentric work.

Professor Jennifer Parker-Starbuck is Head of the Drama Department, University of Roehampton, London, and co-Editor of Theatre Journal. She is the author of Cyborg Theatre: Corporeal/Technological Intersections in Multimedia Performance, co-author of Performance and Media: Taxonomies for a Changing Field, co-editor of Performing Animality: Animals in Performance Practices.