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Past events

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3 July 20209:00

POSTPONED- Intercultural Competence Conference 2020

One day only conference supported by AULC and UCML.. Full details
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1 July 20209:00

South Asia Centre PGR workshop

The event involves presentations by students from History, English, Geography and Anthropology at Exeter, and from the History department at Quaid-i Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Commentators are from Exeter, Bristol, Royal Holloway, QAU, Islamabad, LUMS, Lahore and CSSSC Kolkata. Full details
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3 June 202015:30

The notion of happiness - across centuries, cultures and media (Round Table)

1) Early Modern Happiness and Gardens between Britain and China 2) Enlightenment Happiness and the Literary Imagination in Germany and Spain 3) Modern Happiness and Housing between Austria and Britain. Full details
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20 May 202015:30

Piecing Together the Fragments

‘Piecing Together the Fragments’: Jo Balmer is an acclaimed poet, known for her ‘transgressions’ – translations of ancient literary texts, which go beyond translations in order to accommodate personal reflections and autobiographical moments. More recently she has expanded the field of ‘texts’ which inspire her poetry to include non-literary works such as dictionaries, headstones furniture. In a recent volume of poetry – Letting Go – she turns to ancient authors, such as Thucydides, Livy, Virgil and Hesiod – to explore and articulate her grief at losing her mother. Full details
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6 May 202015:30

Work in progress (4)

tbc. Full details
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18 March 202015:30

Work in progress (3)

tbc. Full details
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19 February 202015:30

Work in progress (2)

Jonathan Bradbury, ‘The drawbacks to women bathing in rivers in early-modern Spain; or, the public versus the private’. Full details
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5 February 202015:30

European Cinemas of Girlhood

tbc. Full details
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22 January 202015:30

'Content matters less than shape': Anthony Burgess, Giuseppe Gioachino Belli, John Keats

In ABBA ABBA (1977), Anthony Burgess effectively uses the biographical novel as a way of presenting his own highly original verse translations of a nineteenth-century Italian poet. Set in papal Rome in the winter of 1820/21, Part One of the book charts a fictional meeting between the consumptive John Keats and his Roman contemporary, the sonneteer Giuseppe Gioachino Belli; Part Two showcases 71 inventive versions of Belli’s sonnets in what Burgess misleadingly calls English with a Manchester accent. Reflecting on his hybrid novel in an essay entitled ‘Is Translation Possible?’, Burgess remarked that ‘Translation is […] transformation’. My recent edition of the text for the collected Irwell series proves that a) Burgess was initially concerned merely with translating Belli; and b) that Burgess worked collaboratively on these translations. Why, then, go to such lengths to publish them in this creative format? Why juxtapose Italian and English literary cultures at all?. Full details
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11 December 201915:30

Work in progress (1)

a) Aidan Coveney & Laurie Dekhissi (Université de Poitiers) : Variation between qu’est-ce que & pourquoi in Conflictual Rhetorical Questions in French. b) Benjamin Shears (PhD Student in French and English Literature) Education in the novels of Samuel Richardson and Voltaire’s contes philosophiques.. Full details
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27 November 201915:30

Translating, publishing and illustrating an Italian masterpiece: The many French lives of 'The Betrothed' (1827) by Alessandro Manzoni

The paper will analyse the context in which Manzoni’s novel The Betrothed (1827) was made available to the French public, from the first two rival versions in 1828 to the countless shortened and revised editions published throughout the century and up to the 1960s; these successive versions played a major role in conveying a distorted image of The Betrothed, reducing a complex and pessimistic novel to a naive edifying story meant for a Catholic audience and/or for young readers. Such a shift in interpretation can still be felt today in Manzoni’s reception in France – and not only in France. The special case of Manzoni’s novel therefore sheds light on the way implicit or explicit ideological and commercial strategies can take precedence over linguistic and literary concerns. While this paper will include occasional comparisons between the source text (Italian) and the target text (French), it will focus mostly on the context and para-text, including prefaces and images. Full details
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13 November 201915:30

Reading, Writing and Translating Women (Round Table)

1)Dr. Katharine Murphy (Hispanic Studies): Women Readers in turn-of-the-century Spain. 2)Viola Nesa Cadruvi (Pfeiffer) (Doctoral candidate and assistant lecturer, Romansh Culture and Literature, Institute of Romance Studies, University of Zurich and visiting researcher in DML, Exeter): Gender research in a minority language – problems and profits: Rhaeto-Romanic Literature in Switzerland 3)Dr. Helen Vassallo (French): Invisible women? Gender, translation and hospitality. Full details
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16 October 201915:30

Translation, Advertising and Culture: Selling Italian Products Abroad

If we look at print ads of Italian products for an Anglophone market from a diachronical perspective, we can see that they reiterate very specific and connoted images of Italy and Italianness all over the world. Italian culture is metaphorically ‘translated’ into visual and verbal discourses that a British, American or English-speaking audience can immediately recognize and be charmed. Looking at them closer we can see how ads are always cultural representations created for a target consumer who possesses his own mental representations, attitudes and values. Stuart Hall’s notion of translatability of culture in terms of shared conceptual maps, codes and signs is useful in decoding these ads, as they are the result of a set of social conventions through which individuals become cultural competent subjects. If on the one hand, ads of Italian products abroad are dictated by economical choices, on the other hand, they are the result of social practices strictly linked to a collective ideol. Full details
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9 October 201915:30

Visualising Latin American Discourses from a Digital Rhetoric Perspective

Latin American electronic literature is still a relatively unexplored area of study as far as interdisciplinary research methodologies are concerned. This study aims to construct a scientific and artistic exchange between Digital Rhetoric, Latin American Cultural Studies, and Digital Humanities to examine the role of digital rhetoric practices in the construction of cultural discourses in Latin American works of electronic literature. The research project aims to facilitate an interdisciplinary dialogue between these previous approaches in order to provide new methodological tools to study Latin American electronic literature from different disciplines and perspectives, and incorporate digital practices in the humanities, such as data visualisation techniques to facilitate evaluation, comparison, and analysis of our results. Following recent methodological approaches on Digital Rhetoric, and Latin American Cultural Studies, I address three main questions: 1) How are discourses and conc. Full details
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27 September 201910:00

Translation! Festival 2019: Languages in Motion

Translation! Festival 2019: Languages in Motion is a one-day festival across three venues in Exeter city centre to celebrate the uniqueness and diversity of languages and cultures from across the world. Full details
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24 June 2019

Institute of Coding Summer School 2019 at the University of Exeter

For students with little or no experience of programming or coding, the Institute of Coding Summer School at Exeter is an opportunity to enhance your digital skills through a course designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of computer programming and social data analysis. Full details
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5 June 201915:30

Work in Progress (2)

Seán Morris (Translation Studies PhD): Mid-17th century bilingual mathematical works in France Yandi Wang (Translation Studies PhD): Sociological Translation Studies in English writing on Chinese Political Pop and Cynical Realism paintings. Dr Muireann Maguire (Russian): Bobok: A Future Prequel, or Anticipatory Plagiarism in Russo-Irish Literature Dr Ben Phillips (Russian): Buried Alive: Dostoevskii’s Notes from a Dead House in Late-Victorian Britain. Full details
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22 May 201915:30

Revisiting the re-translation hypothesis. Translation defaults, textual time and kairos.

The re-translation hypothesis – the idea that there is teleological improvement from one translation of a source text to the next – has been largely discredited since it was first put forward by Antoine Berman and Paul Bensimon in 1990. But Berman’s own translational practice and reflection in L’Âge de la Traduction, his 180-page commentary on Walter Benjamin’s ‘Die Aufgabe des Übersetzers’, may allow the hypothesis to be recast. Berman’s commentary reflects upon Benjamin’s German text and on Maurice de Gandillac’s French translation thereof. Berman thinks and re-translates Benjamin, to a significant degree, through Gandillac. He acknowledges longstanding criticisms of Gandillac’s translation (then the only existing translation) but argues that French readers should nonetheless acknowledge the ‘gift’ that Gandillac made them in the sixties when he introduced Benjamin’s texts into France. The many revisions to Gandillac’s translation that were made both by the translator himself and by subsequent editors point to the complexity of Benjamin’s text and the humility of the translator in the face of this complexity. It is against this background that Berman’s introduction of the concept of the translational défaillance should be understood, his rendering of the term Versagung, borrowed from Freud, a term that I will render as “default”. Defaults are not errors or failings but point to nodes of textual resistance; they are an inevitable part of the translation process. I will show, via my own English translation of L’Âge de la Traduction, how the concept of the “default”, coupled with Berman’s reflections on textual time and kairos, may help us re-think the re-translation hypothesis, situating re-translation as a dialogic, collaborative process of mothering – in the sense of birthing – a text. Full details
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16 May 201914:30

Landscape archaeology and geospatial technology, Dr. Cesar Parcero Oubina (INCIPIT)

Dr Cesar Parcero Oubiña is an archaeologist working at INCIPIT, Spain. Full details
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8 May 201915:30

Research Groups in ML session, convened by CTC

Katie Brown (Latin American), Ina Linge (Medical History), Emma Cayley (Medieval Studies/Early Modern), Sam Yin (Global China), Danielle Hipkins (interdisciplinary film studies) have kindly agreed to be there in person and give a 5 minute talk on their respective centres. Helena Taylor will be away on a research trip in May, but has generously offered to let us have a short written statement for Early Modern Studies.. Full details
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22 March 20199:30

Cities in South Asia

This event will bring together research students, advanced scholars and heritage practitioners for a multi-disciplinary discussion focussed on the study of cities in South Asia. All Welcome. Full details
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20 March 201915:30

Instead of seeking new landscapes, develop new eyes: challenging aridity in the Atacama Desert, Adrian Oyaneder Rodriguez (Exeter)

Adrián Oyaneder Rodriguez is a PhD candidate in Archaeology at the University of Exeter.. Full details
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20 March 201915:30

Science in the Vernacular: Translating Galileo

The speaker – Mark Davie, formerly Head of Modern Languages at Exeter and Italian editor of the Modern Language Review, is the translator, with William R. Shea, of Galileo’s Selected Writings (Oxford World’s Classics, 2012). An Honorary Fellow at Exeter, he is currently working on a complete translation of Galileo’s Dialogue, his argument in support of the Copernican model of the universe, also for Oxford World’s Classics. Discussant: Dr Jonathan Bradbury (University of Exeter) The event – Galileo’s reputation as a leading intellectual figure in Europe was established by his short book Sidereus nuncius, describing his observation of the heavens using the newly invented telescope, written in Latin and published in Venice in 1610. In the same year he resigned his university chair at Padua and accepted the patronage of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, moving to Florence where he remained for the rest of his life. From this point onwards all his major works were written in Italian, i.e. Tuscan, vernacular. With his decision to abandon Latin in favour of the vernacular Galileo effectively translated scientific discourse from the academic world to a princely court. Mark’s paper will consider Galileo’s reasons for making this change, its consequences for scientific writing in a modern European language, and the challenges it presents to a translator of Galileo into modern English.. Full details
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18 March 20199:30

Women and Quarrels in Early Modern France/Les Femmes et les Querelles dans la France de la première modernité

In recent years, critical attention has recognized the influence of cultural quarrels – for instance, about the canon, about women, about the soul – in shaping early modern France (see, for example, the Agon project at Paris-IV.) A number of these disputes took women explicitly as their subject – notably the long-standing ‘querelle des femmes’ – or were provoked by women’s cultural productions (for instance, the late seventeenth-century quarrel about the novel). However, women were often discouraged from direct engagement in quarrels; indeed, such opposition was part of the arguments about women’s place in the public sphere. The philosopher, Pierre Bayle, wrote, of Marie de Gournay and the controversy surrounding the Jesuits in the wake of the assassination of Henri IV, that ‘a person of her sex should avoid this sort of quarrel’. Alternatively, if they did quarrel, they were often dismissed with the age-old topos of being ‘quarrelsome’. And yet, despite this hostility, there are examples in early modern France of women engaging in quarrels, not only about their sex, but also about matters of culture, science and religion. This one-day conference sets out to investigate women’s roles as speaking subjects – rather than objects – in quarrels spanning the mid-sixteenth to the late eighteenth centuries in France. It aims not only to bring together a series of case studies but also to think about common concerns: how did women quarrellers negotiate a hostile reception? Is the art of quarrelling gendered? Does the study of female quarrellers nuance our approach to quarrels more generally? Topics to be addressed include: • Strategic use of quarrels by women • Quarrels and self-fashioning • Women’s quarrels with other women • Women quarrellers and genre • Gender and rhetoric • Communities and group identification (inclusion/exclusion) • Public and private quarrels • Terminology and gender (e.g. querelleuse, bilieuse, harengères, caquet). Confirmed speakers: Derval Conroy (University College Dublin), Catriona Seth (University of Oxford) and Myriam Dufour-Maître (Université de Rouen). Full details
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13 March 201915:30

Decolonizing Knowledge in Contemporary Chilean and Latin American Cinema, Joanna Page (Cambridge)

Dr. Joanna Page is Reader in Latin American Literature and Visual Culture at the University of Cambridge.. Full details
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7 March 201915:30

"Who is Afraid of Tolstoy? Contemporary Literature and the Canon in the Schools of Five Countries, 1814-1914"

Guest Lecture organized by Russian, supported by CTC. Full details
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7 March 201915:30

"Who is Afraid of Tolstoy? Contemporary Literature and the Canon in the Schools of Five Countries, 1814-1914"

tbc. Full details
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6 March 201915:30

Uncovering the Shocking Truths at the Heart of the Spanish-Aztec Encounter, Prof. Matthew Restall (PennState)

Prof. Mattew Restall is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Latin American History & Anthropology, and Director of Latin American Studies, at the Pennsylvania State University.. Full details
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6 March 201915:30

Our hermeneutic models into question: French Theory in/and American Poetry

In the field of English studies, the hermeneutic model of the 20th century inherited from post-structuralism and the French theory steered by intellectuals such as Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault or Jean Baudrillard seems to have disappeared for the benefit of a return to historicism, or on the contrary, has contributed to the development of cultural studies. This has entailed a taxonomy that challenges the Aristotelian notion of poetics and of genre. However gradual, the evolution in humanities has been radical, most especially in literary criticism, and has had numerous consequences on the very nature of what we now identify as “literature,” as “text,” and on the way we approach and read this/these new object/s. In such a context, it would be interesting to study what structuralism and post-structuralism can still bring to literature, and more particularly what close reading and French theory can still bring to American poetry, rather than what literature and poetry. Full details
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27 February 201915:30

Indian Women in the Conquest of South America: São Paulo and Asunción during the sixteenth century, Dr Elisa Fruhauf Garcia (UFF)

Talk delivered by Dr. Elisa Frühauf Garcia, from the Universidade Federal Fluminense (Rio, Brazil), currently a visiting scholar at the University of London.. Full details
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27 February 201915:30

Heritage Film, Neapolitan Style: Ammore e Malavita and Napoli velata

Glynn: Heritage Film, Neapolitan Style: Ammore e Malavita and Napoli velata. O’Healy: Migrant labour in southern Italy: The contrasting perspectives of Sangue verde, Mediterranea and El Dorado. Full details
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20 February 201917:45

Prof Katherine Hodgson's Inaugural Lecture

Since the late 1980s a mass of previously unknown material has emerged to challenge Western views of Soviet writers either as conformist hacks obediently following the Communist Party line, or as heroic figures resisting state censorship. This evidence, considered alongside texts previously available to scholars, reveals a picture of literary life which lacks such clear distinctions. As the USSR recedes into memory we can ask whether the literature of the Soviet period was in fact so radically different from what had gone before. 1917 may look like a moment when links with the past were severed, yet plenty of already established writers remained on the scene for decades. The Soviet Writers’ Union was created to replace independent writers’ networks and associations, but the longstanding tradition of informal writers’ circles nevertheless persisted. In the early 1990s some critics felt able to dismiss Soviet Russian literature as ‘of anthropological interest only’.. Full details
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20 February 201915:30

Human rights and cultural rights to heritage in Latin America, Francesco Orlandi (Exeter)

Francesco Orlandi is a PhD Candidate in Archaeology at the University of Exeter. Full details
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20 February 201915:30

Film-making on the left

This event has been cancelled. Full details
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13 February 201915:30

Colonialism in Latin American Road Movies, Dr Natalia Pinazza (Exeter)

Dr. Natalia Pinazza is a Lecturer in Portuguese Studies (Lusophone and Latin American Culture) at the University of Exeter.. Full details
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6 February 201915:30

Flying Saucers in Italy: The Italian case towards a global history of science fiction

The speaker: Dr Giulia Iannuzzi (Università di Trieste) studies science fiction in a historical and comparative perspective, history of publishing, and new media. Her two latest books – Fantascienza italiana: Riviste, autori, dibattiti, dagli anni Cinquanta agli anni Settanta (Milan: Mimesis, 2014) and Distopie, viaggi spaziali, allucinazioni: Fantascienza italiana contemporanea (Milan: Mimesis, 2015) – are the essential reference for any study of science fiction in Italy. The event: Science fiction as a genre with its easily recognizable repertoire of themes and tropes is a unique vantage point from which to observe the functioning of a trans-national literary production. Building on the increasing attention to non-English traditions as well as to the idea of global or world science fiction that Science Fiction Studies have experienced in recent years, this seminar will offer an overview of the translation phenomenon in Italy. A brief outline of long-term trends, and quantitative evidence in 20th-century series will be the starting point to critically assess the agency of publishers and translators in shaping ideas of genre, brought to light in publication choices, and in the adaptation of original texts by means of paratexts and translation choices. The close reading of a selection of cases will help illustrating a complex series of motives at work behind a vast range of domestication practices: from the adaptation to a readership different from the original one, to issues of cost and seriality that often took precedence over artistic considerations. The history of science fiction translations in Italy aptly emblematizes wider-reaching cultural processes, from changes in segments of readership, to the shifting connections with other linguistic areas.. Full details
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30 January 201912:30

Dubious Distinctions: Why Europe, not China was Responsible for the Great Divergence?

Professor Michael Adas is the Abraham E. Voorhees Professor and Board of Governor’s Chair at Rutgers University. His books include Machines as the Measure of Men: Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance (1989) and Dominance by Design: Technology, Social Engineering and America’s Civilizing Mission (2006). His talk will be related to a collaborative book project he is currently working on. It will focus on the early modern developments in Western Europe and China.. Full details
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23 January 201915:30

ML Work in progress

Kaye: Popular performance for new urban audiences: reconnecting M50 creative cluster with Shanghai All-Female Yue Opera. Özler: Queering the family and modes of belonging in contemporary Italian women’s writing. Lu: The relation between media and translation. Paver: Worthy Words: How Exhibitions about the Nazi Era Are Framed by Public Speech. Char: The New Woman in Britain and the Arab World at the Fin-de-Siècle and Early Twentieth Century. Full details
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13 December 201814:30

Exploring Capitalism. Historical Archaeology and Heritage of the Modern Expansion into Antarctica, Ximena Senatore (CONICET)

Seminar co-organised by Archaeology and EXCELAS. Dr. Ximena Senatore is a researcher at CONICET (Argentina) and member of ICOMOS International Polar Heritage Committee.. Full details
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12 December 201814:30

Connected Keywords in Early Modern France

This round table brings together three specialists in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century French literature and culture: Helena Taylor, Adam Horsley, and Hugh Roberts. We shall present a methodology of relevance to other time periods and languages, namely word history as a means of exploring contested areas of social and cultural history. We shall pay close attention to keywords that were not fully determined and that could thereby become the focus of ideological debates as various parties sought to define them for their own purposes.. Full details
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5 December 201815:30

Venezuelan Literature and the Bolivarian Revolution, Katie Brown (Exeter)

The sixth EXCELAS seminar of the term will be delivered by Katie Brown, Lecturer in Latin American Studies. Full details
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5 December 201815:00

Translation as a Lingua Franca. The East Asian Response to Global English

Translation as a form of resistance to globalization can be studied in relation to the quest for a common language in East Asia, the fastest-growing regional community in the world in the last few decades. The region has seen at least three lingua francas used in its history, including English, Chinese and Japanese, and the roles of these “languages of wider communication” have been variously documented and studied. In particular, English, the present-day language of dominance, has troubled the East Asian community. The successes of over a century of learning English as a foreign language (EFL) notwithstanding, there is still skepticism concerning the amount of time and effort spent on acquiring a foreign, Western language. In this light, translation becomes a much valorised solution. The role that translation can play in the preservation of local (as opposed to global) values has been underscored by mainstream translation theorists. In the face of the global spread of the English language, it seems that English should be the “language of translation.” But what about Chinese, whose characters have infiltrated Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese, and which has been empowered through the rapid rise of China? Obviously, too, there are historical lessons that should be learnt from the spread of Japanese throughout the region during the colonial period. The choice of a language for translation will be the focus of serious debate in the years to come, and the present paper attempts to outline some of the implications involved. Full details
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5 December 201815:00

Global China Research Centre Seminar Series: Translation as a Lingua Franca, the East Asian Response to Global English

Professor Leo Tak-hung Chan is professor of Translation from Lingnan University, Hong Kong.. Full details
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29 November 201817:30

Clandestine Correspondence at Court (Niklas-Cartwright lecture)

During over 20 years Marie Antoinette exchanged notes and letters with the Imperial Ambassador to France, count Mercy. Was she a naive puppet of the Habsburgs, betraying French secrets? Is there any foundation to the accusations of political scheming made at her trial? The more than 100 letters and notes, many of them unpublished, which she wrote to the diplomat during her time in Versailles and at the Tuileries give answers to these and to many other questions. Catriona Seth was appointed to the Marshal Foch Chair at Oxford three years ago after a career spent in France. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and a membre associé of the Académie Royale de Belgique. She has worked extensively on French literature, editing Les Liaisons dangereuses and the works of Germaine de Staël for the Pléiade. She has published autobiographical texts by women along with a book-length study of inoculation and an intellectual biography of the poet Parny.. Full details
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28 November 201815:30

Translating Research Cultures: the French Social Sciences and Humanities in English

This talk will explore the challenges and broader implications of translating between two academic research cultures, specifically translating the French social sciences and humanities into English. French academics are under increasing pressure to use English as a lingua franca, creating substantial demand for specialist academic translations. In this field, the cultural mediation required of translators is very specific in nature. It involves producing texts for multiple readers — the original authors, but also other audiences such as peer reviewers, funding committees, journal editors, and the national and international academic community. The competing expectations generated by this situation seem to require incompatible degrees of domestication and the translator plays a complex role in this cultural transaction, compounded by a form of “invisibility” partly intrinsic to the academic framework. In this context, it is also interesting to ask what this negotiation process can tell us about the research cultures in question. What can we learn from the points of resistance encountered when navigating between the norms, values, and assumptions of two radically different epistemological traditions and, more broadly, what are the potential consequences and/or losses inherent to the hegemony of the English language in the academic world?. Full details
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27 November 201816:30

'Deconstruir' los mitos de la independencia sudamericana, Inés Quintero and Rogelio Altez (Venezuela)

EXCELAS Seminar with Inés Quintero and Rogelio Altez from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Please note that this seminar will be delivered in Spanish.. Full details
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26 November 201816:30

Animate Ivory: Materiality, Beauty, and Pygmalion's Statue

The story of Pygmalion’s ivory woman, transformed into a living woman, posits a relationship between animacy and materiality that I will interrogate through a focus on several medieval French translations of Ovid’s story. I will explore the terms in which medieval poets describe the inanimacy of the statue, and I will foreground the materiality and the material of Pygmalion’s ivory woman in order to ask whether Pygmalion’s beloved lady, as white as ivory, can tell us something about the values that organize the association of animacy and whiteness in medieval Europe. Full details
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21 November 201816:30

Patchwork Cities: Urban Ethnic Segregation in the Global South in the Age of Steam, Michael Goebel (Geneva)

Shared EXCELAS and CIGH seminar given by Michael Goebel,Associate Professor in International History at the Graduate Institute, Geneva.. Full details
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21 November 201815:30

Chinese and European Perspectives on Architecture and Heritage

In our paper we use Trachtenberg’s dialectical model of building temporality as a lens for comparing building practices in China and Europe. The paper begins with a brief comparative study of St Peter’s Basilica in Rome and the Forbidden City in Beijing, highlighting how building through time in both examples diverges, reflecting very different attitudes towards material culture, concepts of heritage and physical and cultural contexts. The second part of the paper will examine a contemporary building project in Yancheng (Salt City), an ancient city located on the north bank of the Yangtze River. Called ‘Water Street’, this commercial project was modelled on traditional shopping streets from the Ming and Qing dynasties. The study will demonstrate how the conscious emulation of building forms and associated ceremonial/ritual practices from the past, in a city whose built heritage was largely erased from history, provides an intriguing example of how ‘historical fabrication’ was implemented outside any temporal or contextual framework that would be deemed meaningful from a Western (European) perspective. Full details
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14 November 201815:30

Polity. Demystifying Democracy in Latin America, Joe Foweraker (Exeter)

Exeter Centre for Latin American Studies Seminar.. Full details
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14 November 201815:30

Bilingual Autobiography

Linguist Ofelia Garcia proposes the term ‘translanguaging’ to refer to a ‘dynamic bilingualism’ that ‘is centred, not on languages as has often been the case, but on the practices of bilinguals that are readily observable in order to make sense of their multilingual worlds’. In this paper, I examine Kim Thúy’s practice of translanguaging in her 2013 text Mãn. In this text, Francophone Vietnamese writer Thúy blends French and Vietnamese to create a dynamic, plurilingual idiom. I focus on three narrative strategies that Thúy develops: her bilingual inscriptions in the margins of each page, her frequent citations of Vietnamese with no accompanying translation and her creation of words and expressions that meld the two languages to create plurilingual neologisms. Taken together, these strategies move her text beyond the blending of two discreet languages to the invention of a new form of communicating subjectivity in transit. Full details
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8 November 201817:30

When the Mediterranean Moved West: Pathways of Catalan Emigration in the Americas

Thomas Harrington is Professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford (USA), where he offers classes on contemporary Iberian literature, cinema, and cultural history. His main lines of research are recent Peninsular movements of national identity, Iberianism, Contemporary Catalan culture, cultural theory (especially Polysystems Theory), and the migrations between the so-called peripheral cultures of the Peninsula and the societies of the Caribbean and the Southern Cone. He is the recipient of two Fulbright scholarships, and the Batista i Roca prize for his work in disseminating Catalan culture in the world. In addition to his academic work in Hispanic Studies, he is a frequent commentator on politics and culture in the US press and a number of Spanish- and Catalan-language media outlets. Full details
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7 November 201818:30

Film screening 'Tierra Sola' and discussion, Paul Merchant (Bristol)

The EXCELAS second seminar of the term will have Dr. Paul Merchant, Lecturer in Latin American Film and Visual Culture at the University of Bristol, introducing the film 'Tierra Sola' (tbc) and moderating the post-film discussion.. Full details
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24 October 201815:30

The Birth of Brazilian Amazonian Societies, Prof. Mark Harris (St Andrews)

The Exeter Centre for Latin American Studies first seminar of the year will be delivered by Mark Harris, Professor of Historical Anthropology at the University of St Andrews. Full details
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17 October 201815:30

The Reception of Oscar Wilde in Spain through Theatre Performances in Spanish Translation

This lecture will focus on the reception of Wilde’s dramatic production in Spain at the turn of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries – the two periods in which the stage reception of his creative work was at its richest. Wilde’s plays were first introduced through the translations and theatre productions by Ricardo Baeza, an influential figure in the literary and theatrical circles of the time. The reviews of those early performances, together with Baeza’s translations, provide insight into the factors that triggered the performance history of Wilde in Spain and determined his continuous presence in the country’s theatre repertories. The centenary of Wilde’s death in 2000 sparked a renewed interest in the writer’s work in general, which could also be seen in the country’s theatres; so, in the second part of the lecture, we will turn our attention to productions in the 1990s and early twenty-first century. The analysis of those earliest and latest Spanish performances will hopefully throw light on the reception of Wilde in translation and on his contribution to the theatre world in Spain.. Full details
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4 October 201817:30

Portraiture and Risk

Portraiture tends to be regarded as a conservative genre, its purposes being to reinforce the status quo, consolidate power and mitigate absence or death. Conversely this lecture considers ways in which portraits can disrupt social and aesthetic norms even within pre-modern systems of patronage. Risk-taking by sitters and artists is explored through a range of portraits, primarily from eighteenth-century France. At this time of Enlightenment the emergence of capitalist society coincided with new philosophical ideas on human agency. Full details
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3 October 201815:30

Unusual Chinese Film Festivals: Unusual Sites of Translation

In November 2017, I was on the jury of the Golden Horse Awards in Taipei, which are part of the Golden Horse Film Festival. This summer (2018), I am on the jury of the DC Chinese Film Festival. In this talk, I will use these experiences to reflect further on the idea of film festivals as “sites of translation” developed with colleagues in an AHRC-funded research network a couple of years back and which result in the eponymous book co-edited with Luke Robinson. How do these festivals translate foreign cinema into Chinese-language contexts and vice versa? How do they translate the concepts and practices of film festival cultures into their local environment? The Golden Horse is an unusual amalgam of industry awards and film festival – why has this combination worked in the Taiwanese context? And the DC Chinese Film Festival is an independent event not sponsored by the Chinese government – why have the organisers wanted to set it up and been willing to sacrifice so much free labour to sustain it?. Full details
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13 - 14 July 20189:00

Transactions and Documentation in the Persianate World

First workshop within the ERC-funded project ‘Forms of Law'. Full details
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7 June 201815:30

Volkswagen in the Amazon: The Tragedy of Global Development in Modern Brazil - Dr. Antoine Acker, University of Zurich

Exeter Centre for Latin American Studies Research Seminar. Full details
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6 June 201815:30

Translating Cultures Work in Progress Seminar

This session will consist of four, informal fifteen-minute presentations (details below), followed by drinks and discussion. All most welcome! Dr Helena Taylor (ML, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow) ‘Women, Quarrels, and Literary Authority in late 17th-Century France' Dr Adam Horsley (ML, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow), ‘Imitation, Translation, and Authorial Identity at the Trial of the Libertine Poet Théophile de Viau (1623-25)’ Sorcha O’Boyle (PGR, Translation Studies) 'In the face of uncertainty: decision-making and risk management in the translation process' Delphi May (PGR, Hispanic Studies and Film) ‘Representations of (Spanish-) Chineseness and Chinese immigration on Spanish visual media: an overview of style, perspective, and interaction’ Dr Zoe Boughton (ML, Linguistics) ‘‘Patterns of gender variation in French phonology: towards a typology of variables’. Full details
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23 May 201815:30

'Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio: A Transnational and Transmedial Icon'

Abstract: According to the art historian Patrick Hunt ‘Caravaggio is the most renowned Old Master of recent times. More articles, books, exhibitions, films and novels have been devoted to him than to all of his contemporaries combined’ (p. ix). If Caravaggio’s iconic status and transnational popularity can almost be taken for granted today, what is still relatively unexplored is the painter’s impact across different media, in particular in the some areas of popular culture like music, dancing, theatre, fashion, advertising and graffiti. Dr Rorato’s research paper will focus in particular on fashion, advertising and graffiti as all three cultural forms are visually very powerful but work in very different ways. The paper will fit very well within the context of our Centres for Translating Cultures and for Intermedia as well as our brand-new term 2 MA module in ‘Translation as Intercultural and Intermedia practice’, as it will explore intermediality through the analysis of a popular Italian icon. In particular, through a series of case studies the paper will address the following questions: 1) What makes Caravaggio such a globally iconic figure today? 2) What kind of mechanisms facilitate the ‘transition’ of a canonical artist from the museum to the market place? 3) What happens to the original “meaning” of an artist’s work when his/her image moves across different cultural forms?. Full details
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9 May 201816:00

Modern Humanities Research Association Lecture: 'The Realm of Dreams: Impressions from a Journey through its Cultural and Literary History'

The Realm of Dreams: Impressions from a Journey through its Cultural and Literary History’. After a short introduction to cultural dream-work, Professor Engel will sketch interpretations of dreams from different literatures and periods, crossing genres into art and film, ‘starting probably in the Ancient Near East and, hopefully, landing somewhere in the present’. Professor Engel is co-director of a research committee of the International Comparative Literature Association, ‘Dream Cultures: the Cultural and Literary History of the Dream’. The committee has a global membership that includes our colleague Ricarda Schmidt. Professor Engel is also Associate Director of the Oxford Kafka Research Centre. Full details
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3 May 201817:30

Inaugural lecture by Professor David Jones

This lecture looks at the rich vein of recent photographic and installation art inspired by the idea of the forensic. The preoccupation with evidence gives rise to installations which engage with our desire to archive everything, from photographs and written documents to lifetracking data. Elsewhere artists respond to the understanding of objects as evidence (from digital photographs to bodies and bones). The lecture considers the implications of their standpoints to evidence, and of the ‘counter-forensic’ stance to which their work gives rise. Full details
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3 May 201817:00

Baat-Cheet: India, China and the fear of the state next door, 1950-62

A South Asia Centre Baat-cheet seminar. Full details
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2 May 201815:30

Issues, factors and strategies in the translation of multilingual operas

Prof. Mateo is Professor of Translation Studies at the University of Oviedo and is in Exeter for six months on a Spanish government-funded visiting professorship. Her talk (in English) will be open to all, undergraduate, postgraduate and colleagues alike. Abstract: This talk will first discuss some key issues that are raised by the translation of multilingual operas –relating to the question of meaning, the function of language in musical texts (particularly complex in plurilingual ones) and the advisability of translation; it will then look into the various factors that may influence translation strategies, examining some target texts of a few relevant libretti (with varying functions and degrees of multilingualism) which have been produced for different translation modalities.. Full details
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18 - 20 April 201811:00

BASAS 2018

The most important annual event of the biggest professional association for South Asianists in the UK. Full details
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22 March 201817:30

Inaugural lecture by Professor Adam Watt

Chairs are banal, ordinary, everyday. This lecture sets out from the academic notion of the ‘personal chair’ and pauses for thought on some of modernism’s chairs. It ranges from Poe’s ‘Philosophy of Furniture’ to rocking chairs and wheel chairs in Beckett, by way of Proust’s fauteuil magique and a range of chairs in Woolf, Sartre and Ionesco among others. The lecture proposes that a consideration of the roles of these chairs might offer some alternative insights into the changing sensibilities and preoccupations of writers across the twentieth century. Full details
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21 March 201815:30

'Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio: A Transnational and Transmedial Icon' POSTPONED

Abstract: According to the art historian Patrick Hunt ‘Caravaggio is the most renowned Old Master of recent times. More articles, books, exhibitions, films and novels have been devoted to him than to all of his contemporaries combined’ (p. ix). If Caravaggio’s iconic status and transnational popularity can almost be taken for granted today, what is still relatively unexplored is the painter’s impact across different media, in particular in the some areas of popular culture like music, dancing, theatre, fashion, advertising and graffiti. Dr Rorato’s research paper will focus in particular on fashion, advertising and graffiti as all three cultural forms are visually very powerful but work in very different ways. The paper will fit very well within the context of our Centres for Translating Cultures and for Intermedia as well as our brand-new term 2 MA module in ‘Translation as Intercultural and Intermedia practice’, as it will explore intermediality through the analysis of a popular Italian icon. In particular, through a series of case studies the paper will address the following questions: 1) What makes Caravaggio such a globally iconic figure today? 2) What kind of mechanisms facilitate the ‘transition’ of a canonical artist from the museum to the market place? 3) What happens to the original “meaning” of an artist’s work when his/her image moves across different cultural forms?. Full details
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7 March 201815:30

“Translating Research Cultures: the French Social Sciences and Humanities in English”

Abstract: This talk will explore the challenges and broader implications of translating between two academic research cultures, specifically translating the French social sciences and humanities into English. French academics are under increasing pressure to use English as a lingua franca, creating substantial demand for specialist academic translations. In this field, the cultural mediation required of translators is very specific in nature. It involves producing texts for multiple readers — the original authors, but also other audiences such as peer reviewers, funding committees, journal editors, and the national and international academic community. The competing expectations generated by this situation seem to require incompatible degrees of domestication and the translator plays a complex role in this cultural transaction, compounded by a form of “invisibility” partly intrinsic to the academic framework. In this context, it is also interesting to ask what this negotiation process can tell us about the research cultures in question. What can we learn from the points of resistance encountered when navigating between the norms, values, and assumptions of two radically different epistemological traditions and, more broadly, what are the potential consequences and/or losses inherent to the hegemony of the English language in the academic world?. Full details
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22 February 201815:30

El lado de acá de la locura, or how the novismos ‘vietnamised’ the Angolan war.

Exeter Centre for Latin American Studies Seminar. El lado de acá de la locura, or how the novismos ‘vietnamised’ the Angolan war. Dr Raquel Ribeiro (University of Edinburgh). Full details
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21 February 201815:30

Enlightened Enmity? The Enemy of the Human Race in French Revolutionary and German Romantic Culture

Abstract: The category of the ‘enemy of the human race’ has been the subject of increasing critical attention in recent years. Alongside an extensive body of theoretical literature that reads the figure through the lens of Schmitt, Foucault and Agamben, a new wave of cultural and legal-historical scholarship has impressively remapped aspects of its genealogy as a powerful rhetorical device for enabling claims to legitimate violence. The present talk seeks to add to this scholarship by analyzing (i) the (re-)emergence of the concept of the enemy of the human race as a rhetorical and ideological construct in French revolutionary culture; and (ii) its subsequent remediation in German Romantic efforts to write the nation in the early nineteenth century. This focus allows us to shed light on a previously neglected mode of cultural transfer from France to Germany around 1800 that, in turn, encourages renewed reflection on the relations between German Romantic nationalism and the values of Enlightenment thought. Full details
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21 February 201813:00

Baat-Cheet: Is India Ready for Universal Basic Income?

An Exeter South Asia Centre Baat-Cheet seminar. Full details
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14 February 201813:00

Baat-Cheet: Narrating war, imagining ideal warriors for the Maratha Empire: Marathi narratives from western India

This seminar is hosted in conjunction with the Centre for the Study of War, State and Society. Full details
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7 February 201815:30

‘Marrying Cultures: Queens Consort and European Identities 1500-1800’ [Joint Seminar with Centre for Early Modern Studies]

Summary: Professor Watanabe-O’Kelly has led a three-year international, collaborative HERA-funded project ‘Marrying Cultures: Queens Consort and European Identities 1500-1800’, based at the University of Oxford, Lund University, Sweden, the German Historical Institute, Warsaw, and the Herzog August Bibliothek, Germany. The project centres on the consort as an agent of cultural transfer with specific focus on a series of case studies, including the Polish princesses Katarzyna Jagiellonka, Duchess of Finland and Queen of Sweden (1526-83), and Zofia Jagiellonka, Duchess of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (1464-1512); Hedwig Eleonora of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp, Queen of Sweden (1636-1715), and Charlotte Amalie of Hessen-Kassel, Queen of Denmark (1650-1714); the Portuguese princess Catarina of Braganza, Queen of Great Britain (1638-1705); and Luise Ulrike of Prussia, Queen of Sweden (1720-82). Full details
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1 February 2018

Theatre, Translation and the Presence of Urgency. Seeing the Future from the Past

Theatre, Translation and the Presence of Urgency. Seeing the Future from the Past. Professor Catherine Boyle (King’s College London).. Full details
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31 January 2018

Inaugural lecture by Professor Nuria Capdevila-Arguelles

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24 January 201815:30

'Narratives of Child Sexual Abuse in Italian literature. Results, implications and questions'

Summary: I will briefly summarize my research and exemplify it with recent publications and work in progress. I will then focus on the ultimate meaning of my work: what is it? My first answer – stressing the need of a better understanding of texts that have been rarely discussed and whose value is seldom acknowledged – makes sense within my disciplinary context. However, child sexual abuse is studied by law scholars, psychiatrists and social workers. What role do literary studies play in this wider context? Or, in other words, how does literary culture translate into legal, medical or welfare-related cultures? Focused on the Italian context, my answer is three-fold: literary authors and readers have often been more (and sometimes less) perceptive than specialists working on abuse; the stories told by literary authors can better prepare communities for the supportive roles that they are increasingly expected to have; and well-told, socially validated stories are needed for the recovery process. Examples will be given. Full details
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24 January 2018

Historical Links between Indochinese Islam and China

Chinese sources have recorded several joint Arab and Cham missions to China in the Song period. One of the most important families of Muslim traders in Quanzhou in the late Song/early Yuan period had moved there from Champa in coastal Vietnam, which would later serve as a main stop-over for the Zheng. Full details
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16 - 17 December 2017

The First International Conference on Global Discourse and Chinese Experience

: Global China Research Centre co-organised a workshop with Shanghai Academy of Social Science. Full details
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13 December 201715:30

Translating canonical texts: a discussion (with illustrations from Russian and French)

Martin Sorrell has recently published a Selected Poems of Apollinaire with Oxford World’s Classics (see a glowing review here - https://academic.oup.com/fs/article/70/4/611/2197881/G-uillaume-A-pollinaire-Selected-Poems-Translated); Muireann Maguire has published a review essay on recent translations of Tolstoy (and Tolstoy translation more generally) and is an active translator from Russian; and Adam Watt has written the introduction and notes to a new English translation of Proust’s Un amour de Swann (trans. Brian Nelson) forthcoming in November with Oxford World’s Classics https://global.oup.com/academic/product/swann-in-love-9780198744894?cc=gb&lang=en& and has a chapter forthcoming on Derek Mahon’s translation of Valéry’s Le cimetière marin. Discussion will attend to a range of matters relating to translating ‘classics’: why do we (re-)translate? should we buy into the ‘each generation needs its own Dante/Tolstoy/Proust (etc)’ argument? what was particularly challenging about translating Apollinaire? how do different translators approach Tolstoy? how do we handle the annotation of translations? Audience intervention and participation most welcome!. Full details
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6 December 201715:00

Famine and Dearth in India and Britain: Texts, Images, Archives

A roundtable discussion focused on the project database as searchable digital archive and pedagogical tool, and on the overall project as an example of multilingual, interdisciplinary research that links insights of cultural history and comparative literature with current issues of global food security. Full details
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29 November 201715:30

‘Romancing the truth: vernacular history and the origin of fiction’ (Joint seminar with Centre for Medieval Studies)

Abstract: Romancing the truth: vernacular history and the origin of fiction In her influential Romancing the Past, Gabrielle Spiegel argued that early 13th-c. vernacular prose played a key role in enabling a truly historical discourse to disengage itself from fictional writing. Her analysis often presupposes, however, definitions of ‘fiction’ and ‘history’ that do not map comfortably either on to medieval terminology, or on to medieval textual practice. The early thirteenth-century Histoire ancienne jusau’à César—one of Spiegel’s key texts—repeatedly offers or alludes to multiple versions of well-known episodes of its ‘history’ (such as the Trojan horse or Eneas’ descent into hell), in order explicitly to vaunt the verisimilitude of its own account in contrast to the fables in circulation. This lecture will argue that texts like the Histoire ancienne thereby define ‘fiction’ far more clearly than they do ‘history’ and also that the transmission of the Histoire ancienne can be used to demonstrate that the fluid boundary between ‘history’ and ‘fiction’ remains problematic—and fascinating—throughout the Middle Ages. Indeed, the category to which the various forms of writing in vernacular prose (whether ‘historical’ or ‘fictional’) are all committed is the truth, but how then is the truth to be told in the relatively new and unstable medium of vernacular prose?. Full details
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15 November 201715:30

Translating Cultures Work in Progress Seminar

Edward Mills, PGR, French/Medieval Studies: 'Twelfth-century translations of Cato’s Distichs into Anglo-Norman French'// Jon Bradbury, Hispanic Studies/Early Modern:‘The challenges of editing a seventeenth-century polemic'// Ulrike Zitzlsperger, German/Modern Literary and Cultural Studies: 'Berlin Wall Souvenirs'// Zoe Boughton, French/Linguistics: ‘Women behaving badly? Paradoxical patterns of gender variation in French phonology’. Full details
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18 October 201716:00

'Recovering the Amateur Tradition in Translation of Classical Literature' (Joint seminar with Centre for Early Modern Studies)

Dr Gillespie is completing a major new study with OUP, entitled Newly Recovered English Classical Translations, 1600-1800. His talk will attend to some of this material and specifically the kinds of things we can learn about wider European translation culture by recovering amateur traditions of translation. A description of the book is below: Newly Recovered English Classical Translations, 1600-1800 is a unique resource: a volume presenting for the first time a wide-ranging collection of never-before-printed English translations from ancient Greek and Latin verse and drama of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Transcribed and edited from surviving manuscripts, these translations open a window onto a period in which the full richness and diversity of engagement with classical texts through translation is only now becoming apparent. Upwards of 100 identified translators and many more anonymous writers are included, from familiar and sometimes eminent figures to the obscure and unknown. Since very few of them expected their work to be printed, these translators often felt free to experiment, innovate, or subvert established norms. Their productions thus shed new light on how their source texts could be read. As English verse they hold their ground remarkably well against the printed translations of the time, and regularly surpass them.. Full details
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18 October 201713:00

Baat-Cheet: Company paintings workshop

This workshop is for conceptualising and planning an exhibition of Indo-British art, popularly known as 'Company paintings.' The exhibition would be jointly contributed to by the Victoria Memorial, Kolkata, and the RAMM, Exeter. The workshop will be led by Dr. Jayanta Sengupta, Secretary and Curator of Victoria Memoria, Kolkata.The workshop is organised and hosted by the Exeter South Asia Centre, in association with the Centre for Imperial and Global History. All welcome. Full details
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4 October 201715:30

Übersetzungen: Transatlantic Modernism and the Dissemination, Adaptation and Transformation of German Cultural Imports in the United States, 1918-1945

Dr Vike Plock, Dr Kate Hext and Dr Peter Riley (all Dept. of English, Exeter) discuss an emerging research project. Abstract: This interdisciplinary, collaborative research project investigates the dissemination and adaptation of German culture in the US in the early twentieth century (1918-1945). In particular, it asks how networks and intellectual exchanges between Germany and the US were developed, redefined and politically mobilised in the US by US citizens and German-speaking immigrants for the explicit purpose of projecting imagined communities that had the potential to transcend national boundaries and generate resistance to cultural and political hegemonies at home and abroad. McCarthyism and the cultural legacy of the Second World War erased from view contributions from foreign intellectual communities in the US and developed a more narrowly defined view of American culture. For this reason, it is difficult for today's scholars to see these transatlantic networks between individuals and institutions that addressed political challenges and global concerns through translating into US contexts those intellectual imports coming from German-speaking countries in the period selected for study. While the story of some highly visible, eminent individuals such as Thomas Mann, Arnold Schönberg or Theodor Adorno has often been told, this project hopes to bring together different humanities scholars with the explicit purpose of uncovering these other cultural currents that have been obscured by historical circumstances. By drawing on a wide range of previously unused archival and material repositories, this research will provide a unique new focus for the study of transatlantic modernism, US-German relations, American exceptionalism as well as exile studies and comparative literature. Full details
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2 October - 16 November 2017

From Albion to the Regions of the North: Russians in Devon, Devonians in Russia

This exhibition examines cultural and military links between Devon and Russia, from the 1700s to the present day, showcasing the Devon and Exeter Institution's unique collection of books about Russia by Devon authors, but also revealing forgotten historical connections, such as the involvement of men from the Devonshire Regiment in Britain's little-known military intervention in the Russian Civil War in 1919-20.. Full details
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29 September 201710:00

Translation! Festival

Join us for a celebration of languages and cultures from across the world. Come along to a range of thought-provoking, exciting and interactive events at venues around Exeter city centre, celebrating the uniqueness and diversity of languages and cultures. Discover the many innovative and creative ways of translating between them…the written word and beyond!. Full details
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27 September 201712:00

Heteroglossia in/and Translation

This workshop invites scholars and practitioners working with multiple languages to share their experiences, compare notes, and discuss effective and ethical ways of understanding multi-lingual terrains, and of moving within them. Scholarship on translation has acknowledged the difficulty, and indeed fallacy, of working with an expectation full set of corresponding equivalent vocabulary, and criticized the denunciations arising out of consequent frustration. In this workshop, we wish to use these findings and explore whether we are in a position to move beyond a notion of bounded, discrete languages, and the act of translation as moving across well-defined boundaries. Full details
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27 September 201712:00

Workshop "Heteroglossia in/and Translation"

Workshop on multi- and trans-lingual practice, including the historic and contemporary uses of heteroglossic vocabularies. Jointly organised by South Asia Centre and Centre for Translating Cultures, and featuring material-based discussion in pairs, each pair connecting and comparing the European and South Asian contexts. Full details
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17 September - 27 October 2017

At the Heart of the Nation: India in Britain

‘At the Heart of the Nation’ draws belated attention to the wide-ranging contributions Indians have long made to Britain’s cultural, economic, intellectual, political and social life. It is based on two major Open University research projects, 'Making Britain' and 'Beyond the Frame'. the exhibition launches in September 2017, and tours until November 2017. It will be showcased around the United Kingdom, in the cities of London, Edinburgh, and Leeds. The exhibition will be free and open to the public. Full details
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14 - 18 August 2017

Hindi-Urdu advanced language training workshop

Exeter’s Foreign Language Centre will become one of only a very small number of providers in the South West to offer this language course, which will provide beginners with an introduction to the study of both languages simultaneously.. Full details
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13 July 201710:30

China's Belt and Road Initiative

Welcome 10:30-10:45. Full details
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21 June 201715:30

‘I don’t get it’: Alterity and Ethnography in West Berlin

A Translating Cultures Seminar. Knowledge of German not essential!. Full details
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16 June 2017

Postutopian Returns: The Peach Blossom Spring in Contemporary Chinese Landscape Aesthetics

The return to regional political, philosophical, and religious discourses on the position and agency of humans within the planetary system has, of late, engendered alternative approaches towards utopian visions.. Full details
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7 June 201715:30

The Obligation to Migrate: Narratives of Muslim Migration in Soviet Translation

A seminar by Dr Rebecca Gould (University of Bristol) for the Centre for Translating Cultures The Obligation to Migrate: Narratives of Muslim Migration in Soviet Translation This talk engages with literary renderings of the archetypal Muslim migration story, the hijra of Muhammad, in the literatures of the Soviet Caucasus. The ancient Muslim migration narrative functions in Soviet poetry and prose as a bridge between past and present, and a tool that refracts a political reality that, due to Soviet censorship, could not be directly exposed. By translating an early Islamic historical phenomenon into a Soviet present, Georgian, Chechen, Ingush, and Abkhaz writers managed to comment on their political present. They used the early Islamic rhetoric of migration (hijra) to come to terms with the tsarist-era expulsions of the indigenous peoples of the Caucasus to Ottoman lands as well as to engage elliptically with the Stalin-era deportations of these same peoples to Central Asia. The novels and poems I discuss show how translation, broadly understood, can support and nurture political critique even and especially when the immediate object of critique remains obscured. I use examples from Georgian poetry to describe this process.. Full details
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31 May 201713:00

Bengal special: two papers on the geography and history of Bengal

Two papers, by Andrea Butcher and Zuleikha Chaudhuri. Full details
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24 May 201715:30

Seminar by Prof. Sharon Marcus (Columbia) 'Sarah Bernhardt’s Exteriority Effects: Affect, Performance, Agency

Abstract: Sarah Bernhardt’s audiences often described feeling thrilled and dominated by the star performer, and they relished the ways in which her agency seemed to exceed or even negate their own. This essay uses rarely cited archival materials to identify the performance techniques that induced such extreme responses. Those techniques included mobility, framing, tempo control, and hyperextension, and I group them under the rubric of “exteriority effects.” By attending to exteriority effects and the affects they inspired we can 1) challenge accounts of female performers as lacking agency or exercising it only to extend it to other women; 2) move beyond affect theory’s focus on bad feelings; and 3) reorient accounts of nineteenth-century theatricality away from their focus on interiority and privacy. Sharon Marcus is Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Dean of Humanities, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University, New York. Full details
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10 May 201716:00

Reviving the past, civilising the modern: cultural governance and hegemonic discourse in China

In ‘traditional’, non-democratically elected regimes, cultural governance based on the establishment of a hegemonic discourse is often an important source of legitimacy.. Full details
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10 May 2017

Translating Cultures Seminar - no event this week. Apologies.

Please note - there will be no seminar this week.. Full details
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3 May 201716:00

Threads of connection: South Asian textiles in British collections

Above all else, prolonged commercial and eventually political connection between Britain and India began with trade in high value South Asian textiles. Indian-made silk and cotton cloth of high artistic and commercial value began to find its way into European markets from the seventeenth century, especially through the activities of the East India Company. A result of that history was the creation of significant personal and institutional collections of South Asian textiles, which have many tales to tell. Full details
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29 March 201713:00

Law, Literature and Indo-British Connections, Part II: Sir William Jones

Speaker: Dr Andrew Rudd (English, Exeter). Dr Rudd will continue to explore the connections between India and Britain in the 18th century, specially through the works of Sir William Jones, judge in eighteenth-century Calcutta, and noted Orientalist. Full details
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22 March 201715:30

Romancing the truth: vernacular history and the origin of fiction

A seminar by Prof. Simon Gaunt (King’s College, London) for the Centre for Translating Cultures. Full details
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22 March 2017

Romancing the truth: vernacular history and the origin of fiction.

Professor Simon Gaunt is Professor of French Language and Literature at Kings College London. Full details
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15 March 201712:30

Britain and India: Cross-Cultural Encounters

An English department seminar featuring talks by three members of the South Asia Centre. Speakers: Dr Ranita Chatterjee, Dr Ayesha Mukherjee and Dr Florian Stadtler. Full details
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8 March 201715:30

Mixed feelings: Literary Hispanophilia and Hispanophobia in England and the Netherlands in the Early Modern period and the nineteenth century

A seminar by Dr Yolanda Rodriguez for the Centre for Translating Cultures Seminar Series. Full details
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8 March 201713:00

Baat-cheet seminar on “Legal Fictions: Law, Literature and Indo-British Connections in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries”

Speakers: Dr Andrew Rudd (Exeter) and Dr Nandini Chatterjee (Exeter). Full details
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8 March 2017

How China Sees Global Governance

China's re-emergence as a global power has become one of the most important developments in the 21st century. America’s global retreat under Trump administration has made China’s role in global governance more important than ever before. This talk will discuss China’s role in global governance with a focus on three aspects: economic governance, cyber governance and climate change.. Full details
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22 February 201715:30

Place and Politics in Latin-American Digital Culture: Representing Memory and Trauma Online

A seminar by Prof. Claire Taylor (University of Liverpool) for the Centre for Translating Cultures. Full details
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16 February 201715:30

Translation and Gender: A European Perspective

Abstract Can we talk about a European gender translation geography and is it possible to outline it? There are various questions that should be included as starting points of a possible mapping on gender and translation in Europe, questions that consider many factors such as specific issues in the field resulting from the works of Canadian scholars, the institutionalisation of translation and gender in European countries or the translation techniques and strategies considered as feminist and the objectives there have been outlined in these last decades. A European translation and gender map is an important step in order to recognize the state of art in the various contexts and the possible routes to take acknowledging the many issues that have come out in the literary, cultural and translation theoretical debate in the last decades and which have intersected with gender. To look for theoretical and practical answers to feminist translation theories and practices in Europe today is central in order to understand our cultural production, many aspects of our social formation and our perception of the translator’s role and ethics. Dr Federici is Associate Professor of English and Translation Studies in the Department of Literary, Linguistic and Cultural Studies, University L'Orientale, Naples. Full details
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8 February 201717:30

“Medieval Translatio(n), Modern Rhetoric”

Michelle Bolduc, Professor in Translation Studies at Exeter, is an internationally recognized scholar of Translation Studies and Comparative Medieval Literature (French, Occitan, and Italian), and has published extensively on medieval literature (translatio) as well as on modern rhetoric--the New Rhetoric Project--and its translation. Under the direction of Barbara K. Altmann and F. Regina Psaki, she took a PhD in Comparative Literature with a specialization in Medieval Literatures from the University of Oregon; she has held positions at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Arizona. In this inaugural lecture, Professor Bolduc will explore the influential role played by translation, and in particular, the medieval topos of translatio, in the development of Chaïm Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca’s modern New Rhetoric Project. In this diachronic examination, she proposes the concept of translatio(n) as a key to understanding how rhetoric—as the art of reasoning—becomes for Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca a resource for an ethics of civic discourse essential for a cosmopolitan and multilingual Europe. Full details
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8 February 201715:30

The counter-forensic archive: thinking through forensic art practice’

A seminar by Kathryn Smith for the Centre for Translating Cultures Seminar Series. Full details
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8 February 201713:00

Baat-cheet seminar on "The Banker's Guide to Music: sound and politics in eighteenth-century Bengal"

Speaker: Dr Richard Williams (Oxford). Full details
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2 February 201715:30

Debussy, Mallarmé and the aesthetics of appearing’

A seminar by Prof. Julian Johnson (Royal Holloway) for the Centre for Translating Culture. Full details
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1 February 201713:00

Baat-cheet seminar on “Religious fragmentation and economic outcomes in India.”

Baat-cheet seminar on “Religious fragmentation and economic outcomes in India.” Speakers: Dr Surajeet Chakravarty. Full details
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25 January 201715:30

Innovation in Multicultural Paris French: uses and attitudes

A seminar by Dr Maria Secova (Open University) for the Centre for Translating Cultures Seminar Series. Full details
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18 January 201714:30

Workshop on 'New perspectives on the Indian Emergency, 1975-77'

This workshop on 'New perspectives on the Indian Emergency, 1975-77' is part of the Exeter South Asia Centre seminar series. Full details
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9 January - 31 March 2017

Baat-cheet: Exeter South Asia Centre Seminars

These are the seminars organised by the Exeter South Asia Centre or its individual members. Occasionally, we will advertise and recommend events organised by other centres and departments, if these have significant South Asian content.. Full details
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7 December 201615:30

Translating Italian classics: Petrarch and Boccaccio in English – again

Peter Hainsworth is a Professor of Italian at the University of Oxford, with interests in 13th- and 14th-century poetry and in 20th-century poetry and prose. He will be discussing his experience of translating selections from two canonical authors of Italian literature, Petrarch and Boccaccio. He will consider first of all why further translation of two much translated authors might or might not be desirable, necessary or commercially viable. Secondly he will discuss his particular aims and strategies, looking at the specific aspects of the authors that he wished to bring out and at how he dealt with the problem of reconciling the demands of readability on the one hand and of preserving some sense of cultural difference on the other. In the talk he will look at some short passages, but make no assumptions that his audience has any knowledge of Italian. Full details
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23 November 201615:30

Debussy, Mallarmé and the aesthetics of appearing

The music of Debussy initiates a radical shift of emphasis from the idea of music as a kind of saying to one of appearing. From his youthful setting of Mallarmé’s Apparition to his Trois Poèmes de Stéphane Mallarmé nearly three decades later, the composer’s work forms a counterpoint to the aesthetic thinking of the poet. But what exactly is it that music (the noisy, sounding kind) can tell us about language?. Full details
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19 October 201615:30

Film Festivals: Cinema and Cultural Exchange

Mar Diestro-Dópido is a researcher and regular contributor to Sight & Sound — the monthly film magazine of the British Film Institute—as well as an experienced arts and media translator. Her book publications include a BFI Modern Classic on Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth (2013) and a forthcoming book on Film Festivals, built around her doctoral thesis which won the Association of Hispanists of Great Britain and Ireland's Legenda prize for the best new thesis of 2014. Full details
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15 June 201615:00

Transnational Moroccan Cinema

Prof. Higbee will present his ongoing AHRC-funded project –. Full details
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11 June 2016

“China in the Modern World: Paradigms and Methodologies”

This one day symposium aims to bring together international and UK scholars from different disciplines to discuss and reflect upon current research on China’s interaction with other cultures since the late 19th century in fields such as science, social science, literature and art. We are keen to investigate the trends and patterns of cultural and knowledge exchanges between China and other cultures and to explore the approaches and methodologies that have been applied by researchers to understand and analyse them.. Full details
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1 June 201615:30

Work in Progress Seminar

Dr Julie Rodgers (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) - Maternal Counternarratives in Contemporary Women's Writing and Film in French. Full details
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18 May 201615:30

Loans vs inheritance: the influence of Latin on the languages of Europe

Prof. Nigel Vincent, FBA (Manchester, Emeritus). Full details
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12 May 201619:00

'Las sinsombrero' Documentary Screening and Q&A

The documentary is in Spanish with English subtitles.. Full details
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4 May 201614:00

Agamben and the Meaning of the Middle Ages

This is a joint seminar with the Centre for Medieval Studies. Full details
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16 March 201615:30

Words and Music: Cervantes, Shakespeare, Vaughan Williams and Rodrigo

Raymond Calcraft (University of Exeter, Retired). Full details
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2 March 201615:30

"Just don’t make any alterations to my manuscript". Editing and interpreting E.T.A. Hoffmann

Dr Kalterina Latifi (Heidelberg). Full details
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17 February 201615:30

Image, imagination and power: visualising urban futures in post-war France

Prof. Ed Welch (University of Aberdeen) Joint seminar with Art History and Visual Culture. Full details
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10 February 201615:30

Consumer societies: from the 1950s to today

Prof. Detlef Briesen (Giessen). Full details
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3 February 201615:30

Work in Progress Seminar

Clarice Araujo (UFSC, Brazil, visiting PGR) + Others TBC. Full details
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27 January 201615:00

Eating food in China, Greece, India: taste, the humours and the Cosmos

In his talk, Professor John Wilkins will explore ideas of food and health in Greek and Chinese thought. There are of course many differences between the two cultures, and indeed the Ayurvedic system in India. But they share an idea of the human being within a cosmic system, of the human body having a relationship with the elements that make up the world, and of the dynamic properties that foods and drugs exert on the human body when we eat and drink. There is also a shared notion of harmony in the human body and more widely which corresponds with health and good order. He will give a presentation on how the Greeks (Aristotle and Galen) thought that health was maintained, with a particular focus on taste and the four humours.. Full details
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20 January 201615:30

War Music: The Making of Logue’s Homer

Dr Henry Power (University of Exeter). Full details
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9 December 201517:00

Inaugural lecture: “Middlebrow Cinema: Between Literature and Film in 20th-Century Spain”

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception form 6.00-7.30pm in the Queen's Cafe.. Full details
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9 December 201515:30

Art and the 'Arab Spring': Transnational Aesthetics of Revolution and Resistance

Centre for Translating Cultures research seminar. Full details
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5 December 201510:00

New Work in Modernist Studies

This conference will take the form of an interdisciplinary programme of short papers arranged in panels, reflecting the full diversity of current graduate work in modernist studies; it encourages contributions both from those already involved in the existing networks and from students new to modernist students who are eager to share their work. The day will close with a plenary lecture from a leading modernism scholar (details to be confirmed). Full details
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25 November 201515:30

Women and Classical Translation in Early Modern France

Full details
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11 November 201515:00

Of literary and literal corpora (or the Two Cultures revisited)

Centre for Translating Cultures research seminar. Full details
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13 October 201516:30

Deliciously Disgusted: Translating Villon's "Grosse Margot"

TBC. Full details
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30 September 201515:30

Transnationalizing Modern Languages: Mobility, Identity and Translation in Modern Italian Cultures

Dr Barbara Spadaro and Professor Charles Burdett (University of Bristol). Full details
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7 - 8 September 2015

VI International Conference of the Association of British and Irish Lusitanists (ABIL)

This conference will bring together established and early career researchers, as well as postgraduate students, coming from UK and Ireland, Europe, Brazil, North America and Mozambique, interested in discussing any aspect of Lusophone cultures and histories, from the medieval period to the present. The global theme of the conference is "De/formations: Illegitimate Bodies, Texts and Tongues.". Full details
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