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Photo of Dr Vivienne Xiangwei Guo

Dr Vivienne Xiangwei Guo

Lecturer in Modern Chinese History

4289

01392 724289

I had studied international politics at Peking University, Waseda University and the London School of Economics and Political Science for my bachelor and master degrees. In 2015, I obtained my doctoral degree in history from King’s College London. Between 2014 and 2016, I worked as a research associate and taught modern Chinese history at the University of Cologne in Germany. And since September 2016, I joined the University of Exeter as a lecturer in modern Chinese history.

My research interests primarily lie in the intellectual and political history of the late-Qing and Republican era (c.1840-1949), especially pertaining to the networks, societies and groups formed among Chinese intellectual elites. I am interested more widely in intellectual and cultural histories, in particular the circulation of ideas and movements in a global context.

Research interests

My research interests primarily lie in the intellectual and political history of the late-Qing and Republican era (c.1840-1949), especially pertaining to the networks, societies and groups formed among Chinese intellectual elites. I am interested more widely in intellectual and cultural histories, in particular the circulation of ideas and movements in a global context.

My first monograph Women and Politics in Wartime China places the sophisticated networks of Chinese elite women in the shifting geographical, social, cultural and political spaces of wartime China, where their political engagement, knowledge-making, and network-building in support of ‘national resistance and reconstruction’ unfolded. Examining the emergence, development, integration, and transformation of these networks as an unsettled, fragmented process - a process that moves beyond party ideologies and geopolitical borders, the monograph demonstrates the dynamics of war, spatiality, and identity.

My current research investigates the intellectual and ideological aspects of Chinese warlordism. I am now working on a monograph that attempts to situate the study of warlordism against the backdrop of the Chinese enlightenment, downplay the differences between the 'men of guns' and the 'men of letters', and thereby to redefine, recharacterize and reappraise 'warlords' as active agents – the initiators – of China’s renewals.

Research supervision

I am open to discussing research proposals on any relevant subject given my research expertise. I am especially happy to consider working with candidates with interests in the following areas:

  • New perspectives on the Chinese enlightenment (New Culture and May Fourth Movements)
  • New approaches to warlordism
  • Chinese cultural conservatism
  • Relationship between intellectuals and the party/state
  • Women’s history

 

External impact and engagement

Between 2009 and 2011, working as a freelance journalist for the BBC World Service, I have engaged in the translation and publication of news features in Chinese politics, culture, economy, military and foreign affairs. I also carried out a six-month China project for the Grimstone Foundation in 2010 and drafted a Guidebook of Shanghai to provide British investors with a particular view of China’s history, politics, economy and culture.

Teaching

  • Special Subject: Making a New China: Ideas, Networks, and the Intelligentsia (Year 3)
  • Comparative: Revolutions (Year 3)
  • Sources and Skills: Women and Modern China (Year 1)