Experts discuss how to commemorate marginalised histories of the Second World War

Experts from academia, the media, publishing, education, heritage, and museums discussed how marginalised aspects of Second World War history could be made visible during the forthcoming anniversaries of the conflict at an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded research event led by University of Exeter historian, Professor Catriona Pennell.

Wartime hospital past of Exeter landmark building commemorated

The First World War hospital past of one of Exeter’s landmark buildings and the contribution of doctors and nurses who worked there will be commemorated.

Five Exeter academics awarded British Academy funding

Five University of Exeter academics have been awarded prestigious funding from the British Academy, the national body for the humanities and social sciences.

Tudor and Stuart women spent more time making money than caring for their families, new research shows

Tudor and Stuart women spent more time making money than caring for their families and were regularly employed in physically demanding jobs, according to major new research.

Newspaper small ads used by Victorians for their equivalent of ‘texting’

150 years before the advent of ‘texting’, the small ads of the Evening Standard were used by Victorian lovers to send each other illicit messages, beg forgiveness and arrange trysts.

Sex tips for Victorians: Men with broad noses make passionate husbands

The Victorians may have a reputation for prudery, but new research shows that 19th Century manuals contained explicit sex and flirtation advice.

Pretentious ‘executive’ job titles were a Victorian invention

Pompous job titles, such as hygiene technician and communications executive are not a 21st or even 20th century invention

University of Exeter hosts “Great Debate” for local pupils

Devon pupils competed to win the chance to speak in the Houses of Parliament by debating the significance of women being given the right to vote at a special event at the University of Exeter.

Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme helps young people see scale of First World War losses

A programme which allows a group of pupils from every English school to tour First World War battlefields is helping young people better grasp the scale of loss caused by the battles on the Western Front, analysis shows.

Help recreate pioneering medical instruments with University of Exeter historians

Historians are hoping to recreate pioneering medical instruments created by an inventor who died before he could reveal the secrets of how they worked.

Tudor Royal Court brought to life thanks to Exeter historian

A University of Exeter expert has helped to bring the world of the Tudor court to life for television viewers around the world.

Bishop son of Lord Salisbury suggested political conscientious objectors faced horrors of German bombing raids to change their stance

A prominent bishop and son of the former Conservative Prime Minister Lord Salisbury suggested political conscientious objectors in World War 1 should face the full horror of German bombing raids to “bring about a sudden conversion” from their views.

Historians working to analyse legacy of World War I centenary events

Members of the public are being asked for their views on the way Britain has commemorated the centenary of the First World War by completing a new survey being launched on Armistice Day (11 November).

Sports fans invited to share memories at new Exeter City FC group

A special social group designed to encourage men over 50 to come together and talk about sports and memorabilia has been launched in Exeter.

“Newspapers” devoted to reporting spooky behaviour were a hit with communities in the 17th century

People in the 17th century were so keen to read news of ghostly behaviour that they bought “newspapers” devoted to reporting the latest paranormal goings on around the country, research shows.

Ancient toilet and Elizabethan illustrations among the historic treasures surviving in Exeter’s oldest buildings

An ancient toilet, Elizabethan wall illustrations and Victorian wallpaper are among the historic treasures surviving in Exeter’s oldest buildings, new research shows.

St Pauls inquiry could have prevented 1981 riots, research suggests

A full public inquiry into the 1980 Bristol riots could have prevented similar widespread violence which took place around Britain a year later, a new study suggests.

Educationalists and academics explore how young people engage with history of the two world wars

Educationalists and academics from around the world gathered to discuss the latest research and practical experiences around the way young people engage with the complex histories of the First and Second world wars, including the Holocaust.

Men were diagnosed as infertile in medieval times – and recipes drawn up to cure them, research shows

Men could be held responsible for the failure to produce children as far back as medieval times, a new study of medical and religious texts has shown.

Exeter historian scoops book of the year award

University of Exeter academic Dr Levi Roach has won a prestigious prize for his biography of Æthelred the Unready.

Newly discovered notes show Venetian physician had a key role in shaping early modern chemistry

Newly discovered notes show the Venetian doctor who invented the thermometer and helped lay the foundations for modern medical treatment also played a key role in shaping our understanding of chemistry.

Shortage of essential diphtheria treatment drugs needs international action, experts warn

International action is needed to tackle a global shortage of medicine which could hinder the ability of doctors to treat diphtheria, experts have warned.

Secrets of Powderham Castle - including Earl’s ancestor buried with Henry V - revealed in new exhibition

Family secrets uncovered by the new Earl of Devon – including an ancestor so close to Henry V that the King had him buried in his Royal tomb in Westminster Abbey – are revealed in an exhibition at Powderham Castle.

Holocaust survivor shares horror of Nazi atrocities with children and students

A Holocaust survivor who witnessed the horrors of Nazi persecution of Jewish families shared his experience with Devon pupils and students as part of a memorial event at the University of Exeter.

Defining massacres as ‘a holocaust’ diminishes Nazi persecution of the Jews

Labelling mass killing and massacres as a “holocaust” risks downplaying the scale of the Nazi plan to eradicate the Jews and Roma (gypsies), a leading expert on the holocaust says.

Was James Bond a Feminist? 007 admired ‘modern women’ with a 21st century attitude towards sex

James Bond was not a misogynistic dinosaur but a sensual ‘stylish commando’ who valued strong, independent women with a 21st century attitude to sex, a new book on 007 asserts.

People power stopped early attempts to ruin fun of the pub

Interfering politicians once tried to restrict drinkers to spending just an hour in the pub and to close locals at just 9pm, new research shows.

Experts given £4m to tackle world’s most pressing health problems

Historians, literary scholars, social scientists and medical experts will work together to tackle some of the world’s most pressing public health issues as part of a new £4m research centre at the University of Exeter.

Victorian beard craze inspired false ‘mechanical’ whiskers

Today they are a male fashion accessory, adored by hipsters and spurned by clean-shaven creatives. But in the 19th century, men associated beards and whiskers with manliness, strength and even male beauty.

City event to celebrate Exeter's history following fire

Exeter residents will gather to celebrate the city’s historic buildings which still stand despite the recent devastating fire at an event this weekend.

The Age of the Beard: magnificent examples of 19th-century facial hair on display

A photographic display of magnificent examples of 19th-century facial hair and a special version of the pantomime Bluebeard are part of a new exhibition.

Medical historians and social scientists helping to tackle the world’s most pressing public health problems

Researchers at the University of Exeter will work with the World Health Organization to tackle the world’s most pressing public health problems.

New guide to Devon’s top swear words and insults

Calling someone a nippy or ninnycock today might not cause much offence – but hundreds of years ago if you wanted to be rude these were among a rich choice of crude words available.

Campaigning footballer at men’s mental health event

Former professional footballer turned campaigner Clarke Carlisle met experts at an event held today to discuss how they can tackle male suicide and mental health problems.

Humanities continues to score highly for student satisfaction in National Student Survey 2016

Latest results in the National Student Survey (NSS) 2016 show that the College of Humanities continues to score highly - with students among the most satisfied within UK universities. 

Funding for projects 'uses of the past'

Academics from the University of Exeter have received funding for collaborative projects across with academics across the world from the Humanities in the European Research Area Joint Research Programme.

Family secrets of Powderham Castle revealed

University of Exeter experts are helping the Earl and Countess of Devon uncover fascinating new insights into the long history of their family by examining centuries-old documents at Powderham Castle.

Air power now weapon of choice

Air power has become the weapon of choice for Western politicians because it causes maximum destruction with the minimum of commitment.

Humanities Success at the Teaching Awards 2016

The College of Humanities achieved fantastic success at the Teaching Awards 2016, with five winners and five runners-up, including Best Subject for English.

Exeter subjects ranked amongst very best in the world

The University of Exeter’s status as one of the best academic institutions in the world has been confirmed by new global subject rankings.

Cornish Colloquium hosted to celebrate St Piran’s Day

The University of Exeter will mark its celebration of St Piran’s day with a special Cornish Colloquium.

Study of violent decolonisation may provide lessons about insurgency today

A new study which examines the causes and consequences of anti-colonial violence following the Second World War may offer insights into current conflicts today in the Middle East and elsewhere.

The body, according to the 18th Century

People in the 18th century were expected to look neat, elegant and have a natural shape, according to a University of Exeter academic.

Do Beards Matter: Exploring health and humanity in the history of facial hair

Wellcome Trust funded project launched ahead of World Beard Day