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Current events

The events below are organised by the Department of History. You may also be interested in events in the College of Humanities and general University of Exeter events.

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20 November 201916:00

Gandhi’s Women Satyagrahis: Why do they matter in studying contemporary social-political trends?

Dr Meenal Shrivastava, author of Amma's Daughters (Athabasca University Press, 2018) will talk about her research into women activists associated with Gandhian mass anti-colonial movement in India. Full details
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14 October 202016:00

Centre for Medieval Studies AGM and Welcome!

The first event on this year's medieval research calendar is an AGM and welcome to our new postgraduate students. We will discuss upcoming events, news, and invite nominations for our new post: Postgraduate Representative. Full details
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21 October 202016:00

Research Masterclass: Topic TBC

Research Masterclasses are directed towards the Centre's PhD students and offer expert discussion and insights into particular types of evidence or approaches. Full details
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4 November 202016:00

Ed Roberts (Kent), ‘Documents, Languages and Monasticism in the Early Tenth Century: Archbishop Teotolo of Tours and his Charters’

Ed Roberts (University of Kent) joins us to talk charters and the tenth century. Dr Roberts' talk is based on his current research into the episcopal office in the Latin West between the Carolingian and Gregorian reforms. Full details
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18 November 202017:00

Maria Mavroudi (Berkeley), ‘Comparing Byzantium with its contemporary Islamic and Western Medieval worlds: literary and cultural relations’

We invite Exeter's communities of medievalists and Islamicists to converse with a Byzantinist on topics of shared interest. The moderator of the event is Emily Selove. The guest is Maria Mavroudi, Professor of Byzantine history at the university of California, Berkeley. We encourage participants to submit in advance questions pertaining to the communication of Byzantium with its neighbors to its East and West in the following domains: magic and divination; poetry; satire and humor; philosophy. The goal is to highlight the potential routes that interdisciplinary dialogue among these three scholarly fields can take. Please send your questions to Emily Selove (E.Selove@exeter.ac.uk). Full details
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25 November 202016:00

Maryanne Kowaleski (Fordham), 'Breton Immigration to Late Medieval Devon and Cornwall'

Prof. Maryanne Kowaleski joins us from Fordham University, New York, to tell us about immigration in the late medieval Southwest. Prof. Kowaleski is a prominent scholar in late medieval English urban history and is particularly well known among local researchers for her work on medieval Exeter and Devon. Full details
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2 December 202018:00

Barton Lecture: John Tolan (Nantes), ‘Baronial revolts and anti-Jewish violence in Henry III’s England (1258-1267)’

This year's Barton Lecture is being given by Prof. John Tolan (Université de Nantes). Prof. Tolan is a prominent scholar on intercultural relations in medieval Europe. His publications include books on encounters between Christianity and Islam, both literal and literary. He also works on the history of Jewish communities and his talk draws on his current book project, 'The king's Jews: The Jewish community of England caught up in the conflicts between Henry III and his clerical and lay opponents, 1218-1266'. The Barton Lecture commemorates the work and legacy of Prof. Simon Barton (1962-2017). Full details
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20 January 202116:00

Alice Taylor (KCL), ‘The Problem of Medieval Politics’

Dr Alice Taylor joins us from King's College London to discuss the concept of politics in the Middle Ages. Dr Taylor's research focuses on state formation and government, particularly in relation to medieval Scotland. Her monograph, 'The Shape of the State in Medieval Scotland, 1124-1290' (2016) was an important contribution to the field of medieval political history and won the Royal Historical Society’s Whitfield Prize. Full details
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3 February 202116:00

Virginia Bainbridge (Exeter), TBC

Dr Virginia Bainbridge, one of our honorary research fellows, joins us to talk about the Birgittine brothers of Syon Abbey. Although the origins of Syon Abbey lie outside the Southwest, its medieval books collection is currently housed in Exeter's Special Collections - which makes this talk of particular interest to Exeter scholars. Full details
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10 February 202116:00

John Cooper (Exeter), TBC

Dr John Cooper shares initial thoughts from his new research project on ninth-century nautical/travel/wonders literature, mainly 'The Accounts of India and China' and 'The Wonders of India'. He will present an overview of these works, their manuscript and translation history, the cultural milieu of their production, and their influences (e.g. on the Sindbad stories and hence the Arabian Nights). Full details
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24 February 202116:00

Sarah Kay (NYU), ‘Phenomenal! Star Maps and their Manuscripts’

Prof. Sarah Kay joins us from New York University to introduce us to some medieval star maps. Prof. Kay is an expert in medieval French and Occitan literature, which she combines with interests in medieval philosophy and modern theory. Full details
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10 March 202116:00

Research Masterclass: Topic TBC

Research Masterclasses are directed towards the Centre's PhD students and offer expert discussion and insights into particular types of evidence or approaches. Full details
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24 March 202115:00

Orme Symposium

The annual Orme Symposium showcases the work of three of our postgraduate researchers. Each speaker will give a 20-minute paper, followed by either joint or individual question and answer sessions. Full details
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24 March 202118:00

Orme Lecture: Elisabeth van Houts (Cambridge), ‘Hidden Memories: Medieval Obituaries on Lead, 800-1200’

This year's annual Orme Lecture will be given by Prof. Elisabeth van Houts (Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge). The lecture will explore the medieval custom of burying elite men and women with lead plaques tucked away in their coffins, sometimes placed under their heads. They contained short texts of varying lengths from the name of the dead person to short obituaries which give biographical data and sometimes more expansive eulogies. Some have survived alongside their more public grave stone or tomb. Of particular interest is the conundrum that these plaques were hidden and never meant to be ‘published’ yet they were obviously crafted with great effort to pass on information. What audience did their authors have in mind?. Full details
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12 May 202116:00

Zubin Mistry (Edinburgh), 'Monasteries, Medicine and Reproduction in Early Medieval Societies, c.700-1000’

Dr Zubin Mistry introduces to some of the sources for early medieval medicine, particularly in relation to infertility. Dr Mistry's work concerns medical knowledge and practice in early medieval societies. His interest in reproductive medicine has also led him to consider the political and social implications of infertility in the medieval world. Full details
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26 May 202116:00

Research Masterclass: Topic TBC

Research Masterclasses are directed towards the Centre's PhD students and offer expert discussion and insights into particular types of evidence or approaches. Full details
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