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Photo of Dr Emily Bernhard Jackson

Dr Emily Bernhard Jackson

Senior Lecturer

2451

01392 722451

CV for Dr Emily Bernhard Jackson

Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century Literature, with interests in Literature and Medicine, Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Sceptical Philosophy, Romantiicsm and Popular Culture (specifically David Bowie and the New Romantics), the Embodied Author, and Composition and Rhetoric.

Dr. Bernhard Jackson undertook her undergraduate and postgraduate work in the United States:  she has an M.A. from Boston College and a Ph.D. from Brandeis University.  After publishing articles on Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of scenes from Romantic and Victorian poems, and composition and rhetoric, she published her first book, The Development of Byron's Philosophy of Knowledge:  Certain in Uncertainty (Palgrave, 2010).  After leaving Brandeis, she became an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Arkansas (2005-11), then the Writing Skills Director at Homerton and Robinson Colleges, Cambridge University, as well as Director of Studies for Part I of English at Robinson (variously, 2009-12).

These days, Dr. Bernhard Jackson's main area of research interests are Romanticism and David Bowie, and medicine and nineteenth-century literature. In the first area, she is particularly interested in Bowie's explorations of selfhood; in the second, she is particularly concerned with authors as embodied beings and the influence of the authorial body on literature.

Dr. Bernhard Jackson is also a fiction writer. Her first novel, Death in Paris, was published in 2018; her second, The Books of the Dead, in 2019. Her third is forthcoming in 2021.

She also maintains interests in, but does not actively publish on, Samuel Beckett, sceptical philosophy (modern, rather than ancient), and the form and function of poetry.

Dr. Bernhard Jackson has taught composition for over fifteen years, and she is very active in teaching and promoting excellent academic writing at both graduate and undergraduate levels.  Grammar, mechanics, and the beauty of the written word remain dear to her heart.

Her surname actually is "Bernhard Jackson." It drives her crazy when people refer to her as "Dr. Jackson."

 

Research interests

  • Nineteenth-Century British Literature
  • Lord Byron 
  • David Bowie
  • New Romanticism
  • Nineteenth-Century Literature and Medicine 
  • History of Medicine
  • Composition Studies 
  • Victorian Literature 
  • Romantic Literature (particularly post-1800)
  • Robert Louis Stevenson 
  • Skeptical Philosophy
  • Clothing Studies 
  • John Keats 
  • Percy Shelley
  • Literature and Embodiment 
  • Samuel Beckett

Research supervision

In literary criticism, I am open to supervising dissertations on Victorian and Romantic literature, with the exception of those focusing on gender studies and/or Oscar Wilde.  I welcome applications on medicine and literature, literature and the body (particularly the author's body), and contemporary and popular culture revivifications of the Romantic and Victorian periods.

As a creative writing supervisor, I am delighted to supervise in prose and poetry, with the exception of genre fiction (e.g., fantasy, science fiction).

My own critical approach is historicist, with a deep interest in cultural studies and close reading of primary texts.  I welcome projects that focus on these approaches.

Media

Dr Bernhard Jackson contributes to the Times Literary Supplement, the Literary Review, BBC Radio Devon, and Radio 4.

Modules taught

Biography

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Bernhard Jackson grew up in the lively metropolis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, leading a life punctuated by frequent trips to New York City.  She undertook her undergraduate work at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, Iowa, then took a long pause before pursuing her postgraduate degrees in the Boston area: she has an M.A. from Boston College and a Ph.D. from Brandeis University.  After publishing articles on Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of scenes from Romantic and Victorian poems, and composition and rhetoric, she published her first book, The Development of Byron's Philosophy of Knowledge: Certain in Uncertainty (Palgrave, 2010).  After leaving Brandeis, she became an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Arkansas (2005-11), then the Writing Skills Director at Homerton and Robinson Colleges, Cambridge University, as well as Director of Studies for Part I of English at Robinson (variously, 2009-12).

Dr. Bernhard Jackson has a lively fascination with clothing both inside and outside of literature, and is a keen fan of The Divine Comedy (the band); she has a remarkable knowledge of the trivia of 1980s pop music.  She admires a well-turned sentence and has for many years deplored the comma splice. It drives her crazy when people call her "Dr. Jackson": it really is "Bernhard Jackson."