Dr Guillem Colom-Montero

Research interests

Contemporary Catalan Culture

In 2015 I completed my doctoral thesis in Hispanic Studies at Bangor University. My thesis explored the multifaceted cultural production of Catalan author Quim Monzó’s in relation to cultural and political processes in post-Franco Catalonia. I am currently finalising a book manuscript expanding on my doctoral work, tentatively entitled Quim Monzó and Contemporary Catalan Culture (1976–2016): Cultural Normalisation, Postmodernism and National Politics’. This monograph, which will be the first major study in the English language of Monzó’s work, challenges existing scholarship by contextualising Monzó’s cultural production within a transnational framework and exploring its contradictory relation to the politics of cultural normalization. Related research was the basis of my recenty published article ‘Men in Crisis: Pornographic Images in Quim Monzó’s Fiction’ (Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, 2016), which analyses elements of visuality in Monzó’s work from the perspective of masculinities and sexuality studies. I have started to disseminate my research on Quim Monzó to non-specialists audiences: my article ‘La dreta, l’independentisme i els intel·lectuals’ (http://www.nuvol.com/opinio/la-dreta-lindependentisme-i-els-intellectuals/), was published in the online Catalan cultural magazine Núvol and sparked off debate on  Monzó’s authorial public image.

 

Transnational approaches to the cultures of tourism in the Spanish Mediterranean

My post-doctoral research project takes the Mediterranean island of Majorca as a platform to explore the deep socio-cultural transformations brought about by mass tourism in Spain from the late 1950s onward as well as its transnational ramifications. My work intends to transform understandings of contemporary Spanish culture by considering the mediating effects of tourism vis-à-vis the environmental destruction and spatial dispossession resulting from tourism-related development and activities; processes of deculturation; the rise of consumerism; political corruption; the advent of environmental awareness; and masculinities and gender roles. The project has three main strands. First, it analyses the representation of mass tourism in contemporary Majorcan culture. Second, it explores the transnational tourism imaginaries built around the island of Majorca, with particular focus on British and German culture. Finally, it looks at the socio-environmental impact generated by transnational tourism corporations of Majorcan origin on the Caribbean and Central America since the mid-1980s.

I have delivered papers based on this research in London (Transnational Modern Languages’ conference, 2–3 December 2016), Bangor (‘Comics & Nation’ conference, 13–14 July 2017) and Palma de Majorca (symposium 'Cultura, conflicte i nous subjectes socials en la Mallorca contemporània', 22 December 2017). I have submitted a journal article entitled 'Mass Tourism as Cultural Trauma: An Analysis of the Majorcan Comic Els darrers dies de l’Imperi Mallorquí (2014) and Un infern a Mallorca (La decadència de l'Imperi Mallorquí (2018)' for an Special Issue of Studies in Comics.

 

Research collaborations

I am a member of the Men & Masculinities in Culture & Society (MMICS) Research Network, lead by Dr Connor Doak and Dr Bradley Stephens from the University of Bristol (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/ias/workshops/current-workshops/masculinity-studies.html). I am also a member of the research group LiCETC – Contemporary Literature: Theoretical and Comparative Studies, based at the University of the Balearic Islands and led by Dr Margalida Pons (http://licetc.uib.cat/).