Reconfiguring the Canon of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, 1991-2008

About the researchers

Katharine Hodgson is responsible for the overall management of the project, and is researching the place in the canon of poets associated with official Soviet literature by examining post-Soviet anthologies and journal publications. 

Alexandra Smith is researching the integration of émigré poets into the post-Soviet canon, with reference to the canon-forming influence of documentary film and TV broadcasts, and exploring the role of memoir literature in the canonization of selected figures.

Joanne Shelton is conducting research into educational institutions’ role in canon formation process, and the canon-forming role of publishers and development of market-driven publishing. She is responsible for collating and interpreting information for entry in the searchable bibliographical database, which will show quantitative changes in the prominence of a given poet in post-1991 publications, and the extent of her/his treatment in textbooks and literary histories.

Natalia Karakulina is examining the position in the post-Soviet canon now held by the most canonical of official Soviet poets, Vladimir Maiakovskii. Her thesis will assemble evidence from post-1991 publications of his work in Russia to show how Maiakovskii's position has been affected by the wide-ranging rejection of writers strongly identified as part of official Soviet culture, and examine the extent to which he has nevertheless retained his canonical status.

Aaron Hodgson is working on Nobel Prize winner, and former American poet laureate, Joseph Brodsky. His work seeks to demonstrate not only that Brodsky can be considered to be a part of the canon in its various forms, but also to reveal the specific combination of literary and extra-literary factors at play within his canonization, comparing the relative importance of these factors in the different settings. Underpinning Aaron's analysis is the hypothesis that Brodsky was a part of the Western canon before becoming a part of the Russian canons (the Petersburg-specific canon and the wider Russian canon), and that his place within these canons is due to wider changes within the Russian cultural narrative in the form of iconoclasm, cultural memory, and museumification.

Contact

Professor Katharine Hodgson

Associate Professor in Russian
University of Exeter
K.M.Hodgson@exeter.ac.uk

Dr. Alexandra Smith

Reader in Russian
University of Edinburgh
Alexandra.Smith@ed.ac.uk

Joanne Shelton

Associate Research Fellow
University of Exeter
J.M.Shelton@exeter.ac.uk

Aaron Hodgson

PhD candidate
University of Edinburgh
A.T.Hodgson@sms.ed.ac.uk

Natalia Karakulina

PhD candidate
University of Exeter
nk266@exeter.ac.uk