Publications

This  page lists publications produced by members of the Centre.

Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England, 1450-1700

By Maria Fusaro

Forthcoming with Cambridge University Press

Against the backdrop of England's emergence as a major economic power, the development of early modern capitalism in general and the transformation of the Mediterranean, Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between these two European empires during the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'.

For more details, see the Cambridge University Press website.

Law, Labour, and Empire: Comparative Perspectives on Seafarers, c. 1500-1800

Edited by Maria Fusaro, Bernard Allaire, Richard Blakemore and Tijl Vanneste

Seafarers were the first workers to inhabit a truly international labour market, a sector of industry which, throughout the early modern period, drove European economic and imperial expansion, technological and scientific development, and cultural and material exchanges around the world. This volume adopts a comparative perspective, presenting current research about maritime labourers across three centuries, in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, to understand how seafarers contributed to legal and economic transformation within Europe and across the world.

For more details, see the Palgrave MacMillan webpage.

The Maritime History of Cornwall

Edited by Philip Payton, Alston Kennerley, and Helen Doe

Cornwall is quintessentially a maritime region.  Almost an island, nowhere in it is further than 25 miles from the sea. Cornwall’s often distinctive history has been moulded by this omnipresent maritime environment, while its strategic position at the western approaches—jutting out into the Atlantic—has given this history a global impact.

It is perhaps surprising then, that, despite the central place of the sea in Cornwall’s history, there has not yet been a full maritime history of Cornwall.  The Maritime History of Cornwall sets out to fill this gap, exploring the rich and complex maritime inheritance of this unique peninsula.

More details can be found at the University of Exeter Press website.

The book launch will be held at the National Maritime Museum Cornwall, in Falmouth, on 8 November 2014. For more details contact Franca Driessen.