Environment and Health (An Kerghynnedh ha Yeghes)

Raising awareness of Antibiotic Resistance and One Health in Cornish Key Stage 4 students

Dr Aimee Murray, European Centre for Environment and Human Health.

Key points:

  • This piece is about how researchers can and have engaged with local schools. The researcher wanted to increase awareness about antibiotic resistance.
  • As a means of addressing this, the researcher and colleagues contributed to some GCSE classes in 14 secondary schools across Cornwall, devising a range of activities to encourage learning and reflection about microbes and anti-bacterial resistance.

» Read more about this project

The BlueHealth Project: Protecting and improving our natural environments and our health: a win-win?

Beyond Greenspace (Ben Wheeler), European Centre for Environment and Human Health.

Key findings:

  • Spending 120 minutes or more in nature per week may have positive health benefits, including lower mortality, positive pregnancy and birth outcomes, and better mental health.
  • Looking after our natural environments is important for societal health and well-being. This includes improved environmental quality.
  • Nature needs to be accessible to all of our communities, and there needs to be opportunities to engage in pleasurable outdoor activities.
  • This project has developed guidelines for making nature a sensory experience for visually impaired people.

» Read more about this project

SWEEP: Informing environmental investment for health outcomes

Dr Sian de Bell, European Centre for Environment and Human Health.

Key findings:

  • Investment in, and management of, the natural environment can benefit human health and wellbeing.
  • This requires collaboration between stakeholders in different sectors, from urban planning to public health.
  • Stakeholders need evidence on the effectiveness of different types of investment to aid decision-making.
  • We are working with stakeholders in the South West to co-produce guidance documents and a business case on environmental investment for health.

» Read more about this project

Smartline: How technology can help us to lead healthier and happier lives

Key findings:

  • If you volunteer or help people in your community, your mental health can be improved
  • Developing good relationships with your neighbours can make you happier
  • People who live in social housing have a higher chance of getting asthma

» Read more about this project

Protecting pollinators in Cornwall using road verges and hedges

Ben Phillips, Kevin Gaston, James Bullock and Juliet Osborne, Environment and Sustainability Institute.

Key findings:

  • Road verges and hedges had a much greater abundance of flowers and flower species than field interiors.
  • Road verges and hedges are really important for reversing the decline on pollinating insects.
  • Pollinators tend to be in the centre of verges rather than at the edges, and there are fewer pollinators next to busy roads.
  • Cutting grass verges in the summer reduces the number of pollinators and flowers

» Read more about this project

Constraints to healthcare access amongst commercial fishers

Rachel Turner, Lucy Szaboova, Gwynedd Williams, Environment and Sustainability Institute.

Key findings:

  • Social and cultural norms, organisational constraints and personal concerns all affect how readily fishers access healthcare.
  • Healthcare providers need to offer more flexible service provision if they are to be able to be compatible with the working practices of fishers.
  • There also needs to be work done which can address the attitudes and norms which may lead to a reluctance amongst fishers to seek help.

» Read more about this project

Herring gulls respond to human gaze direction

Madeleine Goumas, Isabella Burns, Laura A. Kelley, and Neeltje J. Boogert. Biosciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus.

Key findings:

  • Most seagulls will not approach a food source in close proximity of people, even if they look like they are interested in the food.
  • Food-snatching behaviour is likely to be conducted by only a few individual gulls.
  • Staring at seagulls reduces the likelihood of them approaching food.
  • Increased vigilance by humans may reduce food snatching behaviour

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Loe Pool Forum: Selection of Msc Research

Neill Wood, Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter, Cornwall.

Key findings:

  • An investigation into whether Helston could have been a port, as claimed by many
  • Using novel techniques for predicting flood risk from surface run-off into the Cober using ground resistivity. Subsequent research has been taking this further, using geophysical techniques to measure the effectiveness of a proposed flood risk mitigation measure.
  • Several studies of Loe Pool and Loe bar including the only detailed bathymetric study of Loe Pool which subsequently informed the design of the new drainage adit through the Bar. Several interesting archaeological features have also been revealed.
  • Flood capacity modelling
  • Catchment area drainage modelling

» Read more about this project