Economy and Business (Erbysiedh ha Negys)

ICS Report: Cornwall’s Post Covid-19 Socio-Economic Recovery

Zachary Collins

Key questions:

  • Ensuring innovation is encouraged through a circular economy, providing technological investment in the creative sector that remains within local economies.
  • Developing and embracing new measures of success- i.e. average PAYE- in order to get a better eye to detail when analyzing inequalities.
  • Being aware of the effects of our stories on Cornwall’s present and future development.
  • Inclusive growth by making sure we are better connected to our communities- and the community is better connected to us to aid resilience efforts.
  • Facilitating better community engagement using our parish and town councils to share information and address local needs.

» Read more about this project

Establishing Environmentally and Commercially Sustainable Techniques for Farming Seaweed

Carly Daniels, Ian Ashton, Renewable Engergy, University of Exeter

Key findings:

  • Seaweed cultivation is a growth area in sustainable food production but also shows huge potential for combating ocean acidification and providing wider ecosystem services.
  • Seaweed is extremely versatile, and can be used in food, biofuels, bioplastics, pharmaceuticals, medicines and even clothing!
  • Cornwall is playing a key role in the development of seaweed aquaculture in England.
  • This study will gather practical, biological and engineering data to explore how seaweed cultivation can be best achieved in a sustainable way. 

» Read more about this project

Cornwall Marine and Maritime Growth & Innovation Report 2017-18

Ms J Pye, Dr A T Alexander, University of Exeter Business School, Cornwall.
Project Partners: Cornwall Council
Cornwall Marine Network

Key findings:

  • Contribution of the Cornish marine sector to the local economy is estimated to be £1.1bn
  • The number of active marine businesses identified in the sector has increased since 2008 from an estimated 650 to an estimated 855.
  • Levels of innovation and entrepreneurship are also considered to be high.
  • Companies also know that they need to diversify to remain competitive
  • Demand for suitable and high quality workspace appears to hold back expansion and diversification
  • Staffing issues are a concern for companies, many with an ageing workforce; those in more peripheral locations in particular have difficulties in retaining skilled staff due to travel and access issues.

» Read more about this project

Assessing the Implications for EU Structural Funding Programmes: Why did Cornwall Vote for Brexit?

Joanie Willett, Garry Tregidga, Rebecca Tidy, Phillip Passmore., Institute of Cornish Studies (Politics and Humanities), University of Exeter, Cornwall.

Key findings:

  • People felt deeply uncertain and insecure about many of the things that they relied on to make their lives function well (such as public services, housing, access to healthcare).
  • In this sense of uncertainty, people felt that the nation state should be able to protect them. When it was unable to make their lives easier, they were then able to say that the UK is under threat from the EU, and felt protective towards the UK.
  • People also felt that many funded projects didn’t reflect things that they felt were important and made their lives feel better. We recommend a more participatory approach to development decisions and that structural funding take a broader approach to the types of projects that can be funded.

» Read more about this project

Challenging Peripheralising Discourses: Connecting New Regional Knowledges.

Joanie Willett, Politics, University of Exeter, Cornwall

Key findings:

  • The stories that we tell about our region are really important for how we want to develop our future.
  • The stories that we tell about Cornwall are compromised by the fact that people don’t always know how the economy has changed in recent years.
  • In Cornwall, one way that we might challenge this would be to make it more clear to people wanting to train and re-train, what skills are needed in the local economy, and where those skills might be gained.

» Read more about this project

Climate Risks and Opportunities for Agriculture in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Alexandra Gardner, Ilya Maclean, Environment and Sustainability Institute

Key findings:

  • A key challenge for Cornwall is to increase food production whilst leaving space for nature, in an era of climate change
  • This project uses the latest climate models to identify the parts of Cornwall that are most climatically suitable for growing novel crops.
  • Growing crops that are well suited to the changing climate may also help to reduce the amount of land required to cultivate in order to make a profit.nologies such as community mobile phone applications might be one way to do this.

» Read more about this project

Labour as Space: Rhythms of Migrant Mobility in the Cornish Agri-food Industry

Dr Constantine Manolchev (University of Exeter Business School), Dr Celal Cahit Agar (University of St Andrews)

Key findings:

  • Migrant workers experience Cornwall and the other locations where they find themselves, through different ‘rhythms’.
  • ‘Regulating’ rhythms control the extent to which migrants can participate in local labour markets, and the type of participation.
  • ‘Connecting’ rhythms link migrants to their home communities.
  • ‘Dressage’ rhythms speed up or slow down their lives, through work or leisure activities.

» Read more about this project

ExeMPLaR Exeter Centre for Multi-Disciplinary Plastics Research

Peter Hopkinson and Tamara Galloway, University of Exeter Business School.

Key points:

  • The hub uses the principles of the circular economy to address the accumulation, impact and costs of plastics in the environment,
  • The 18–month programme addresses both the causes of the problems and efforts to solve them,
  • This research effort connects technical solutions, human behaviours, social, environmental and economic systems with circular economy principles.

» Read more about this project

Tevi

Key points:

  • Tevi is a unique EU-funded collaboration bringing together expertise from across the University of Exeter (circular economy, engineering, ecology, mathematics, business innovation and product design) alongside that of Cornwall Council (environmental growth, policy and strategy, rewards and recognition), Cornwall Wildlife Trust (habitat management, biodiversity conservation) and Cornwall Development Company (grant funding expertise, programme delivery).
  • The aim of Tevi is to help businesses thrive by contributing to Cornwall's environmental growth and transitioning to a circular economy.

» Read more about this project

The Impact of Tourism Economies on Housing in Cornwall: A Critical Evaluation
In partnership with Cornwall Council (Economic Growth and Development, Housing Strategy and Partnerships)

Michael Ireland, Lucy Ellis, Institute of Cornish Studies.

Key questions:

  • How inter-related is the relationship between tourism, the economy of Cornwall, and housing supply and demand?
  • Is there a dependency relationship between tourism and host communities; and tourism and the local authority?
  • What myths regarding housing supply can we explore and challenge, and what do the existence of these myths tell us?

» Read more about this project