Early Modern History 1500-1700: A Social History (HIC2323)

StaffDr Nicola Whyte - Convenor
Credit Value15
ECTS Value7.5
NQF Level
Pre-requisitesNone
Co-requisitesNone
Duration of Module Term 1: 11 weeks;

Module aims

In a series of weekly lectures and seminars, you will explore, amongst other things, population growth and economic upheaval; the politics of community and neighbourhood; poverty, crime, and disorder; social diversification and division; popular religion and culture; literate and oral communication; popular politics and religious conflict; state formation and the expansion of the law; gender and sexuality; the law courts and witchcraft accusations. Throughout the module, we shall evaluate the methods and approaches of the secondary works on these topics. We shall also analyse early modern primary sources in dialogue with the historiography.

ILO: Module-specific skills

  • 1. display a core knowledge of early modern English history, linked to key themes
  • 2. demonstrate critical awareness of the historiography of the period
  • 3. bring primary evidence to bear on their interpretations of secondary arguments about social and economic change.

ILO: Discipline-specific skills

  • 4. analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon historical texts relating to a specific historical period or theme.
  • 5. collate data from a range of sources, both primary and secondary
  • 6. with limited guidance, understand and deploy historical terminology in a comprehensible manner
  • 7. with limited guidance, handle different approaches to history in areas of controversy work with primary sources under direction from the module tutor.

ILO: Personal and key skills

  • 9. show evidence of ability to read and use texts and source materials critically and empathetically
  • 10. present material for group discussion and have respect for others reasoned views
  • 11. with limited guidance, gather and deploy material to produce, to a deadline, a coherent and cogent argument

Syllabus plan

Students will explore the topics of population growth and economic upheaval; the politics of community and neighbourhood; poverty, crime, and disorder; social diversification and division; popular religion and culture; literate and oral communication; popular politics and religious conflict; state formation and the expansion of the law; gender and sexuality; the law courts and witchcraft accusations; urbanisation and urban culture.

Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
221280

Details of learning activities and teaching methods

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities 11Lectures, 1 hour weekly
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities 11Seminars, 1 hour weekly
Essay tutorialoptional

Formative assessment

Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Short presentations 5-10 minutesILOs 1-3,10-11

Summative assessment (% of credit)

CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
10000

Details of summative assessment

Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Essay 1002,000 wordsILOs 1-9, 11Written comments and verbal feedback on formal submission
0
0
0
0
0

Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
Essay 2,000w Essay 2,000w ILOs 1-9, 11Referral/deferral period

Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

Basic reading: P. Griffiths, A. Fox and S. Hindle (eds.), The Experience of Authority in Early Modern England (Basingstoke, 1996) J.A. Sharpe, Early Modern England: a Social History, 1550-1760 (1987; 2nd. ed., London, 1997) G. Walker (ed.), Writing Early Modern History (London, 2005) K. Wrightson, English Society 1580-1680 (London, 1982; 2nd edition, London 2002)

Module has an active ELE page?

Yes

Indicative learning resources - Web based and electronic resources

http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/history/current/

Available as distance learning?

No

Origin date

12/02/2012

Last revision date

23/01/2015