Literature/Anti-Literature (EAS3180)

StaffDr John Bolin - Convenor
Credit Value30
ECTS Value15
NQF Level6
Pre-requisites
Co-requisites
Duration of Module Term 2: 11 weeks;

Module aims

This module engages students in a critical debate concerning a range of innovative and/or influential novelistic texts. Concerned with both the roots of the novel and its modern manifestations, it explores the links (allusive, intertextual, and otherwise) between text, theory, and counter-text. It intends to deepen students’ understanding of a number of issues central to debates around literature today. Connecting writers and theorists fromdifferent national backgrounds as well as time periods, this module closely examines form and content in the light of theory to ask: What is the relation of the literary to history, politics, and the ethical? How might literature be pedagogical, affective, or involved with drives and intensities that are not primarily cognitive?

Students will work with a wide range of texts and improve their close-reading and analytic skills. Since much of the teaching and preparation for seminars in this module involves group work, students will develop their team-working skills and learn to provide constructive feedback to the work of their peers, both face-to-face and via the ELE forum. The emphasis, in seminars, on bringing material prepared beforehand will strengthen students’ presentation skills and confidence. The assessment component consisting of a traditional essay, meanwhile, will enable students to build on their essay-writing skills.

ILO: Module-specific skills

  • 1. Demonstrate an advanced appreciation of the literary in writing drawn from a range of cultures and periods.
  • 2. Demonstrate an advanced critical understanding of a range of relevant contexts (including, but not limited to, cultural, historical, political, philosophical).
  • 3. Demonstrate a sophisticated capacity to understand, apply and consider the limits of various theoretical approaches to literary texts.

ILO: Discipline-specific skills

  • 4. Demonstrate an intelligent and sophisticated ability to analyze literature
  • 5. Demonstrate an advanced and precise ability to work from the detail of literary texts with an appreciation for their formal aspects.
  • 6. Demonstrate an advanced ability to understand and analyze relevant theoretical frameworks and to apply these to literary texts.
  • 7. Demonstrate an ability to construct a coherent and interesting argument engaging with the materials of the course in a way that exhibits intelligent thought.

ILO: Personal and key skills

  • 8. Demonstrate an ability to communicate complex ideas convincingly in both oral and written form.
  • 9. Demonstrate an ability to work effectively individually and in groups.
  • 10. Demonstrate an advanced ability to digest, select, and organize interdisciplinary material and to trace the development of debate across disciplinary boundaries.
  • 11. Through essay writing and other assignments, demonstrate advanced research and bibliographic skills, and intellectually mature capacity to construct a coherent and substantiated argument.
  • 12. Demonstrate an ability to write clear and correct prose.

Syllabus plan

1. Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (Norton Critical Edition, 2nd ed., edited by Michael Shinagel)

2. Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground in Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (Perennial Classics), (New York: Harper and Row, 1968)

3. Samuel Beckett, Molloy

4. Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

5. Thomas Bernhard, The Loser

6. Philip Roth, The Counterlife

7. Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

8. Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian

9. J.M. Coetzee, The Master of Petersburg

10. David Foster Wallace, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men

Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
332670

Details of learning activities and teaching methods

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities33Seminars
Guided Independent33Study group meetings and preparation
Guided Independent70Seminar preparation (Independent)
Guided Independent164Reading, research and essay preparation

Formative assessment

Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Seminar Preparation10 minutes1-9Tutor feedback with opportunity for tutorial follow up

Summative assessment (% of credit)

CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
10000

Details of summative assessment

Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Essay401500 words1-8, 10-12Feedback sheet with opportunity for tutorial follow-up
Essay553000 words1-8, 10-12Feedback sheet with opportunity for tutorial follow-up
Group Presentation515 Minutes1-10, 12Feedback sheet with opportunity for tutorial follow-up
0
0
0

Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
Essay 1500 wordsEssay 1500 words1-8, 10-12Referral/deferral period
Essay 3000 wordsEssay 3000 words1-8, 10-12Referral/deferral period
Group presentationPresentation materials and 750-word reflective piece OR 1500-word essay1-12Mitigation deadline or referral/deferral period

Re-assessment notes

For the seminar, re-assessment will take the form of a two-page, 15 spaced 12 font written summary of a presentation contribution. Time scale for re-assessment is Referral/deferral period.

Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

Core reading

 

Unless indicated otherwise, any scholarly edition of the following will do. Students should purchase their own copies of the following:

  

Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (Norton Critical Edition, 2nd ed., edited by Michael Shinagel)

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground in Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (Perennial Classics), (New York: Harper and Row, 1968)

Samuel Beckett, Molloy

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

Thomas Bernhard, The Loser

Philip Roth, The Counterlife

Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian

J.M. Coetzee, The Master of Petersburg

David Foster Wallace, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men

 

Selected Secondary Reading: Please see ELE for the full list

Any scholarly edition of the following will do.

Georg Lukács, Theory of the Novel

J.M. Coetzee, Doubling the Point

Milan Kundera, The Art of the Novel

Georges Bataille, Literature and Evil

Ian Watt, The Rise of the Novel

Module has an active ELE page?

Yes

Available as distance learning?

No

Last revision date

28/02/2014

Key words search

Literary, novel, theory, philosophy