Past events

Current events can be found here.

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13 December 201715:00

Dr Rebecca Flemming (Cambridge) Galen and the plague

The Antonine Plague, the great epidemic that first swept across the Roman Empire in AD 165, and recurred in waves over the following decades, is now generally agreed to have been smallpox. This identification has been argued for and assumed in the most recent sustained treatments of the topic and has shaped the lively debates on the demographic and economic impact of the plague. But this move rests on shaky foundations, and this paper will challenge this conclusion, and attempt to take the discussion in some new directions, using the evidence provided by the physician Galen, wider comparative work in historical epidemiology, and recent genomic research into past pathogens. Full details
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6 December 201717:00

Dr Emma Cole (Bristol) Greek Tragedy and the Australian Psyche

The reception of Greek tragedy in Australia largely mimicked its reception in England until the mid-twentieth century.. Full details
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29 November 201715:00

Prof. Pat Wheatley (Otago) Polis vs. Basileus: Some New Perspectives on the Siege of Rhodes, 305/04 BC

Abstract to follow. Full details
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22 November 201717:30

Whatever happened to Greek tragedy?

Greek tragedy is one of the most popular and best known genres of ancient literature. But it is not as well known as we like to think, for today all that remains of tragedy is a mere thirty-two plays, a tiny fraction of what once existed. This lecture investigates what happened to all the other plays, and imagines a counterfactual scenario in which a completely different selection of tragedies happened to survive. Full details
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15 November 201715:00

Dr Emma-Jayne Graham (Open) Into the woods: Place and pilgrimage in early Roman Italy

A decade ago, it was suggested that pilgrimage ‘seems to play a smaller part in Roman religion than in Greek’ (Elsner and Rutherford 2007, p. 24). Nonetheless, archaeological evidence from mid-Republican Italy indicates that the inhabitants of towns and villages made use of a range of sacred sites located in various extra-urban settings across the landscape. This paper will explore the evidence for pilgrimage from sites such as these in early Roman Latium, reframing this activity in relation to the performance of movement for ritual purposes and the temporality of place. Focusing closely on evidence from two sacred sites – the well-known monumental sanctuary dedicated to Diana Nemorensis at Aricia, and a much less well-known natural cave and spring at Pantanacci near Lanuvium – it will be suggested that pilgrimage certainly did play a part in early Roman religion, albeit in forms and for reasons that have not been explored before. Full details
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8 November 201715:00

Prof. Richard Seaford (Exeter) Oedipus Oeconomicus

Abstract to follow. Full details
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25 October 201715:00

Research Presentations by PhD students

This week, our current PGR students will give short presentations on their current research. All welcome. Ben Pullan. Reading Pietas in the Appendix Vergiliana; Bijan Omrani. Euripides: Old gods and new philosophies; Rachael Bundy. Ovid’s engendered nightingale: representations of masculine authority and female lamentation in English literature, 1554-1922; Liz Scarth. Battleground of the Mind: Roman Psychological Trauma; Siwaree Attamana. Interaction between the Roman Empire and southeast Asia, c. 100 BC – AD 400; Alasdair Gilmour. The impact of Rome on European Iron Age societies: A cross-societal study of pottery use using merged computer-generated typologies; Lucas Amaya. Title TBC. Full details
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18 October 201715:00

Prof. Elena Isayev (Exeter) Hospitality and Asylum: the measure of society from Homer to the polis, and the UN.

Abstract to follow. Full details
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11 October 201715:00

Prof. Ian Rutherford (Reading) Pindar on the sources of the Nile

Abstract to follow. Full details
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5 October 201717:30

Professor Neville Morley (Exeter) Thucydides and the Politics of Truth

Post-truth. Populism. Democracy in crisis. Increasingly polarised rhetoric. These contemporary symptoms of a society in crisis were prefigured in the work of the fifth-century BCE Greek writer Thucydides – with the promise that anyone reading his account would gain a true understanding not only of past events but of the present and future. Thucydides is still treated as an authority today – but with radically different ideas about what we can learn from him. This lecture will argue that he does not offer maxims or laws, but a training in how to make sense of a complex world in which ‘truth’ itself is in dispute. Full details
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28 September 201717:00

Prof. Rebecca Langlands (Exeter) No-Win Situations: Roman Heroes and Military Ethics

The heroic, blood-soaked tales of their ancestors intoxicated the youth of ancient Rome, revealing moral truths and inflaming them with desire for virtue. This lecture will argue that such exemplary stories were also used to dramatise ethical dilemmas and encourage Romans to reflect on fundamental moral issues - indeed, they can still serve this purpose today. Roman exempla tend to show people of great courage, virtue and tenacity who face very tough decisions about the best way to respond. We will see how a particularly distressing military situation - the desperate suffering of the besieged city - provided for the ancient Romans a wealth of ethical material inviting us to reflect on what we should value most highly in our lives. CA Southwest Lecture. Full details
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6 June 201716:30

The impact of global connections and the formation of the Roman Empire (200–30 BC)

The remarkable development of Rome from small village on the Tiber to a global Empire remains hotly debated. Many scholars still see imperialism as the main driving force and so far all histories of Rome are histories of Empire that take Italy as point of departure. In my lecture I would like to prudently explore a different interpretation of the formation of the Roman Empire, taking my cue from Globalisation thinking as it was recently explored in the CUP volume Globalisation and the Roman world. World History, Connectivity and Material Culture. The period of ca. 200-30 BC forms a decisive stage in the interconnection of the different (Western-, Mid- and Eastern-) Eurasian spheres and from around 200 BC onwards we witness an unprecedented intensification of connectivity all across Eurasia. It is my hypothesis that processes of (growing) interdependency between these regions are key to the emergence of the Roman Empire. I will suggest to understand the formation of the Roman Empire as part of this new wave of connectivity; seeing Roman imperialism as being only one factor to account for it. Many historical developments can be seen as the (often) unintended consequences of increasing interconnection and interdependency. Societies that benefited most were those that were able to transform themselves – knowingly or not– and ride the wave of change. Especially during the formative, late-Republican/Hellenistic phase of ca. 200-30 BC, Romans were struggling immensely with the impact of the ever-widening world they became part of. The interaction with and incorporation of “the foreign” now necessarily became one of the key components of Romanisation. All this had major consequences: Romans conquered the world but simultaneously their society and culture became like that world.. Full details
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31 May 201716:30

Was Aristotle an Essentialist?

To speak of the essence of an object is to speak of those intrinsic features that make the object what it is. This view is rooted in Aristotle's philosophy. His metaphysics (the science of being) is built upon the idea that the principle of every real entity (e.g. human being, horse, plant, house) is its essence. In my talk I will challenge this conception of essentialist metaphysics. In the first part, I will give an overview of Aristotle's metaphysical project and I will focus on the enquiry into sensible objects in book Z. In the second part, I will show that his essentialism is exposed to some philosophical difficulties, which lead Aristotle to dismiss it. Full details
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24 May 201716:30

Port societies in the north-west Roman provinces: cemeteries and sailors’ stories.

To the cities on the coasts and rivers of Roman Britain, Gaul and Germany came individuals who variously moved in the service of the emperor, followed economic opportunities, or were displaced through human trafficking. In contrast however to the Mediterranean, Roman-period human mobility within Cunliffe’s Atlantic façade, especially its northern sectors, has received limited attention. For this the limited epigraphic habit in this zone is partly to blame. This paper therefore reviews the insights into port societies in this region which can be derived from a funerary context; it compares the evidence of funerary inscriptions, of osteological and biomolecular analysis of human skeletal material, and of the rituals by which the dead were buried. It assesses how far funerary traditions in these cities inform the composition and dynamics of port societies. Particular attention will be paid to rituals and objects which appear ‘out of place’. Difficulties of principle and isotope characterisations from human skeletal remains have undermined the connections suggested in the past between ‘exotic’ rituals and the geographical origin of the deceased. Instead the paper considers how non-local practices and objects could be read by participants in ritual as embodying a shared past, a tradition around which communities may have shaped their identity through reference to a perceived common experience and shared origins.. Full details
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17 May 201716:30

Lucian’s Amores and the Greek novels

Lucian’s Amores is one of the risqué works of antiquity. At times bordering on the obscene, it contains the notorious anecdote of agalmatophilia involving the Cnidian Aphrodite, and what constitutes most of it, with constant nods to the standard works on the subject, is the long answer to the question of whether it is better to love girls or boys. But it is also the story of a journey that takes the protagonist Lycinus through places, situations, and encounters with art, which readers of Greek novels in particular would have found familiar. This paper aims to show that a substantial part of the Amores is in fact a web of allusions to the novels, obtained through either the compression or the extension of cornerstone elements from the works of Chariton, Xenophon of Ephesus, and Achilles Tatius. Full details
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10 May 201717:00

Digital Classics

CA lecture: Dr Charlotte Tupman (University of Exeter) Digital Classics (title tbc.). Full details
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29 March 2017

CA lecture: Prof Alison Sharrock, University of Manchester), ‘Gender and transformation in Ovid's Metamorphoses: “optimistic” and “pessimistic” readings'

Further details will be released shortly.. Full details
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22 March 201716:30

Professor Susanna Elm (UC Berkeley), ‘Homeland - Salvian of Marseilles On the Governance of God.’

Salvian of Marseilles composed his treatise On the Governance of God, more accurately on the present judgment of God, in the aftermath of the Vandal sack of Carthage in 439, to try to explain to his audience why God saw it fit to punish the Romans with such severity as he had evidently just done. In eight books that have come down to us in incomplete form, he chastised those who wished to listen for many failings and obvious injustices, arguing that the barbarians had been granted their victories justly. Social historians and those interested in the barbarian migrations have long since mined the work for important insights, but have rarely analyzed it as a cohesive whole, much less asking who exactly the Romans were Salvian had in mind, and what role exactly he assigned to Carthage and Africa. Full details
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15 March 201716:30

Lecture by Prof Chris Kraus (Yale University)

Further details will be announced nearer the time.. Full details
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8 March 201716:30

The empty triclinium: an exploration of Roman food culture.

You are not what you eat. You are what you think you are eating. You are also where you are eating, with whom, when and how. Roman diet has traditionally been studied from the literary perspective and more recently, through the use of archaeological material. It could be argued that the ubiquity of food mentioned in ancient texts, and the abundance of physical remains such as plates, cups, amphorae, carbonized plant remains and animal bones, means that we have a good understanding of Roman food culture. Within certain contexts, we know what people were eating and with whom, what their tableware looked like, how the room was decorated and at what time of day this activity was taking place. We are less sure where people purchased their food and the price of most goods, but, for the most part, we have at least some knowledge of each step of the production, consumption and deposition process. What we do not know, and what has received almost no scholarly attention, is how the Romans viewed and conceptualized their own food culture. What did they think it meant to ‘eat like a Roman?’ Roman food culture is fraught with ambiguity and contradiction. Was there the notion that this ambiguity made it characteristically Roman? Was there even a synonymous notion of Roman food culture or did people retain a localized sense of identity? This paper will attempt to provide answers to these questions and take the unique approach of exploring Roman food culture from the Roman perspective.. Full details
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1 March 201716:30

Dr Ian Goh (University of Exeter), ‘Scipionic bodies’

Event details will be released in the near future.. Full details
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22 February 201716:30

Professor Chris Gill (University of Exeter), ‘Marcus Aurelius, Meditations Book 1- How Roman and How Stoic?’

This talk offers a close reading of book of Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations, focusing on the interplay between typically Roman and Stoic strands. Book 1 has a rather different ‘voice’ from the other books, gives a prominent role to Roman themes, and is less obviously informed by Stoic ideas. However, on closer inspection, the approach and organisation of the book is decisively shaped by Stoic thinking, especially on ethical development; its prominent use of exemplarity is also informed by Stoic thinking. However, Marcus assumes a version of Stoic ethics and politics which is compatible with engagement with Roman social modes. The talk closes by considering the conception of self, and self-shaping, implied in Book 1. Full details
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15 February 201716:30

Dr Donncha O’Rourke (University of Edinburgh), ‘Propertian solutions to Callimachean problems’

The Roman reception of Callimachus as a stylistic model incompatible with long poems on 'kings and heroes' (Virg., Ecl. 6.3) sets up a series of problems for those Roman poets who do, in one way or another, end up writing long(ish) poems on kings and heroes. This is especially true for Propertius, whose affiliation with Callimachean aesthetics defines his elegy in opposition to epic, but whose most explicit self-definition as the 'Roman Callimachus' (4.1.64) launches a poetry-book that breaks the elegiac mould to incorporate the themes of Virgilian epic and Augustan politics. This tension is already well understood. My paper hopes to shed light on some previously unexplored - but in fact rather precise - ways in which Propertius shows that writing long(ish) poems on kings and heroes is perfectly in line with his professed Callimachean credentials. In this way, through a hyperextension of the Callimachean programme, and through the resolution of the problems posed thereby, Propertius, like Virgil, 'stages' a poet of his generation coming to terms with an Augustan poetic agenda. Full details
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8 February 201716:30

Dr Katherine McDonald (University of Exeter), ‘Reitia and the epigraphic habit of Este’

The epigraphic culture of the Veneto region is full of contrasts, particularly between its two largest cities: Este and Padua. At Padua, dedications to the gods were made within the city, many dedications are uninscribed, and all named dedicators are men. At Este, religious activity was focussed on a number of large extra-mural sanctuaries, each associated with a particular deity and social group. At the sanctuary of Reitia, goddess of writing, we find many dedications inscribed in the Venetic language, mostly in the form of bronze copies of writing tablets and styluses. The majority of these inscribed dedications to Reitia were made by women – or at least, they feature female names in the nominative. This paper explores the relationships between the goddess Reitia, the practice of dedicating inscribed writing tools and the position of women in Atestine society. In a society where we expect literacy to be predominantly male, how and why did these practices develop? Does the use of women’s names on bronze writing tablets and styluses provide evidence that women used these objects in daily life? This paper suggests that the dual functions of Reitia – her association with women and her association with writing – came together to create a highly specific local epigraphic practice, whose linguistic and archaeological traces continue into the Roman period of the city. It also argues that the dedicatory practices of women may have affected the wider epigraphic habit of the city, with women’s names appearing at Este more often than at Padua, not just in dedications but also in other text types. Full details
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1 February 201716:30

Taylor Fitzgerald (PhD, University of Exeter), ‘Imperial concordia: dynasty and collegiality in Late Antiquity.

Scholarship on imperial legitimacy during the late third and early fourth centuries suggests a dichotomy between legitimacy based on collegial rule (i.e. the Tetrarchy) and legitimacy based upon dynastic claims (i.e. Constantine and his family). This dichotomy is present for scholarly discussion of the Tetrarchic ‘system’ as well, with some scholars (e.g. Leadbetter 2009) arguing for the prominence of familial connections between the Tetrarchs while others (e.g. Hekster 2015) adhering to the traditional view of the Tetrarchy as avoiding familial ties and presentation—what has been termed a ‘meritocracy’ (Borm 2015). If one looks at the self-presentation of the Tetrarchs (on coinage and inscriptions) as well as the representations of the Tetrarchic imperial college in literature, however, there is more continuity between the emperors of the third century and emperors of the fourth than is often acknowledged. This paper will examine the Tetrarchy outside this false dichotomy by synthesizing examples from a variety of media: imperial coinage, inscriptions, Lactantius’ De Mortibus Persecutorum, and the Panegyrici Latini. The representations of the Tetrarchy in these various forms are often not very different than that of the third-century imperial families: both revolve around the ideal of concordia. Concordia is presented as an imperial virtue important to the Tetrarchy, the idea being that in lieu of dynastic ties, the regime promoted ideas of unity and collegiality. This is found in a variety of media, from statuary to coinage to panegyric. But concordia was also an important imperial virtue throughout the third century and after the end of the Second Tetrarchy. In examining the continuity of concordia alongside representations of imperial colleges this paper will illustrate some of the main themes and arguments presented in my doctoral thesis.. Full details
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25 January 201716:30

Dr Myrto Hatzimichali (University of Cambridge) 'Words or things? The linguistic interpretation of Aristotle's Categories.'

Among Aristotle’s works, the Categories was the most studied and commented on from the first century BC to Late Antiquity, despite the fact that its commentators could not agree on what it was actually about! What did Aristotle divide into ten categories: words, things, or both, including the concepts that link them? This paper will analyse the view of those who took it to be about words (Stoics expecting to find a grammatical theory of parts of speech), and will present an alternative case where a linguistic interpretation is more promising than its rivals. Full details
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19 January 201716:30

Professor Helen King (OU), ‘The material body: what does an ancient womb look like?’

The standard view of votive body parts in the ancient Mediterranean is that there are a lot of wombs and breasts because childbirth was an area on which people felt particularly in need of divine assistance. In this paper, I want to question the identification of these votives simply as wombs. I will do this by setting these objects alongside the different ways in which the womb has been represented in two and three dimensions, and in a range of media, up to the present day, and by showing how textual descriptions can usefully be brought into alignment with visual imagery. Full details
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11 January 201716:30

Professor Barbara Borg (University of Exeter), ‘Straddling borderlines: divine associations in funerary commemoration’

This paper contributes to a longstanding and controversial debate around portraits in divine costume. It aims to disentangle various aspects of divine associations such as metaphorical (verbal or visual) panegyric, a hierarchy of honours, as well as different degrees and kinds of divinity, immortality. I take issue with some prevailing views in classical archaeology: that divine associations are primarily a matter for the freedmen class; or that they must be either mere visual rhetorical panegyric (majority view) or else an indication of apotheosis (normally not further explained). Taking into account a range of different sources including archaeological, epigraphic, and literary, I argue that they rather beg the question of what divinity is, for the Romans, and why it was desirable.. Full details
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7 December 201617:00

'Eye of night: the Moon as a site of optical paradox in antiquity and today' - Dr Karen ní Mheallaigh

Classical Association (South West branch) by Dr Karen ní Mheallaigh. Full details
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1 December 201616:30

‘Ruins and (digital) reconstructions: the cinematic city in Pompeii (2014) and other recent films.’ - Dr Joanna Paul (OU)

The cinema has always been deeply fascinated by the ancient city: from Griffith’s Babylon in Intolerance (1916), through the grandiose Romes of the Hollywood epic heyday, and down to the present crop of CGI Troys, Alexandrias, and more, the urban landscape has been an ideal vehicle for the spectacular display on which such films heavily depend. But the cinematic city is not simply a source of visual pleasure. It also reveals a great deal about how popular culture receives antiquity, and the ways in which interpretations of the past evolve over time. This paper focuses on the recent Pompeii in order to address two key questions: firstly, what kinds of aesthetics govern 21st century screen versions of the ancient city, and how do they relate to earlier traditions? And secondly, how has the digital age affected depictions of these cinematic cities, and the interpretations of the ancient world that they represent? In considering these questions, my paper will explore such issues as: the narrative and cinematographic tropes that characterise cinematic ancient cities; these cities' relationship to other versions of the ancient city, especially digital reconstructions; and the distinctive ways in which these 21st century cinematic ancient cities offer moviegoers a position on the ‘balcony of history’ (Barthes). Full details
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24 November 201616:30

'The science of fiction: knowledge, competitiveness and expertise in Late-Antique heresiology.' - Dr Richard Flower

This paper will explore a group of texts that might not, on first encounter, seem particularly 'scientific' (or even to belong in a Classics department): late-antique polemical catalogues of Christian heresies, usually referred to as heresiologies. These writings, which enjoyed great popularity from the late fourth century onwards, listed different groups of people - some real, some extinct, some fictional - but all regarded by the authors as threats to the faithful. Despite the tendentious and questionable nature of some of the information they contained, however, heresiologies deserve, in my opinion, to be considered alongside other forms of 'technical' and encyclopaedic literature from the ancient world, including the works of Pliny the Elder and Galen. This paper will explore how heresiologists, especially Epiphanius, the late-fourth-century bishop of Salamis on Cyprus, engaged with the methods and traditions of classical technical writings in order to present their texts are part of a secure and uncontentious field of knowledge and to portray themselves as reliable and authoritative experts in this field. It will also examine how, as the genre of heresiology developed, different writers actively sought to position themselves within its literary tradition and to compete with their predecessors and contemporaries for primacy and status. Full details
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17 November 201616:30

‘How to read a Roman portrait”? Optatian, Constantine and the uultus imperii.' - Dr Michael Squire (KCL)

This seminar explores the theme of ‘reading Roman portraiture’ (in Sheldon Nodelman’s classic phrase). It does so, however, with a view to to one of antiquity's greatest – and most conspicuously overlooked – ‘picture-poets’: Publilius Optatianus Porfyrius (active in the first decades of the fourth century A.D., and writing Latin poems addressed to the emperor Constantine). After a brief introduction to Optatian and his oeuvre, the seminar will concentrate on just one particular case study: a gridded picture-poem (carmen cancellatum) that promises to craft within its verses the materialized face of Constantine (fingere… uultus Augusti), and in such a way as to outstrip antiquity’s most celebrated painter (uincere Apelleas audebit pagina ceras). In this gridded poem, the individual letters of Optatian’s words purport to visualize the countenance of the emperor: we come face-to-face with a portrait that lends itself to (literally!) literal ‘reading’. But how should we make sense of the schematic form of Optatian’s image? What does the poem reveal about contemporary notions of portraiture? And how should we make sense of Optatian’s abiding fascination with the respective limits of ‘seeing’ and ‘reading’?. Full details
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10 November 201616:30

'The birth of the medieval dragon.’ - Professor Daniel Ogden

Greek and Roman myth was full of marauding fiery dragons (drakontes, dracones): the Hydra, slain by Heracles; Python of Delphi, slain by Apollo; and the Serpent of Ares, slain by Cadmus, amongst many others. Their physical form was fundamentally that of an enormous, coiling snake (famously a multi-headed one in the Hydra’s case). What we might term the ‘medieval’ or ‘Romanesque’ dragon –the dragon that thrives still in the modern western imagination – exhibits a similar pattern of behaviour, but has a rather different physical form. It remains fundamentally a serpent, but it boasts a fatter body, wings, legs and an animalian head. By what stages, by what processes and for what reasons did the snake-dragons of Classical Antiquity mutate into the more elaborate creatures we know – and love – today?. Full details
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3 November 201616:30

‘Tragedy and the narratology of dreaming.’ - Dr Nick Lowe (RHUL)

Tragedy is the product of a culture with a deep established interest, and investment, in the poetics of dreaming, manifest not just in the prominence of dreams within the texts (and in the epic and lyric material tragedy sets out to repurpose in its new, radically experiential mode) but also, I want to suggest, in some of the most distinctive features of the genre’s own narrative poetics and thematics. The idea that the poetics of narrative mimesis may themselves be founded in the narratology of dreaming is one that has mainly been floated in connection with film (most prominently by Suzanne Langer and Colin McGinn); but the late Bert States argued in a series of thought-provoking publications that theatre, not least Greek tragedy, is if anything even more deeply indebted to the cognitive mechanics of dream narrative. Existing studies of ancient dreaming have been mainly concerned with the cultural history of dreaming, its theory and interpretation, often within a legacy Freudian framework, and only incidentally engaging with current developments in sleep science and the neuropsychology of the dreaming mind, let alone the implications of this work for more fundamental questions in narrative cognition. But a key feature of current neurochemical models of dreaming is that narratogenic functions of waking consciousness are active, even heightened, while others (particularly those involved with working memory and judgment) are radically inhibited, in ways that map turn out to map strikingly on to some of the distinctive features of tragic mimesis. And just as it is possible to argue that the poetics of film, especially popular film, are evolving in the direction of an ever closer approximation to the narrative poetics of dream, I want to make the case that one of the drivers of tragedy’s own evolution, and one of the factors in tragedy’s persistent transcultural reach and power, is an exploration of theatre’s power to simulate and thematise cognitively salient aspects of dream experience. Full details
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27 October 201616:30

‘"Masques de fer:” the face of Rome on the Northern Frontier.’ - Dr Shelley Hales (Bristol)

In the mid first century a man’s ashes were buried in the territory of the Treveri, in the Roman province of Gallia Belgica. They were rediscovered in 1853 as a result of excavations near the village of Hellange in Luxembourg. Although buried in a manner of ‘local’ custom, his grave goods included several pieces of Roman glassware and a metal face mask, which is now identified as belonging to a type of Roman cavalry helmet introduced during the Augustan period. Earliest reports identified the Hellange man as a Druid whilst, in the 1970s, it was suggested that the presence of a Roman mask in a burial, which seems to be ‘Celtic’, must imply that it was obtained from Roman troops by illicit means. The burial is not unique, several others from Treveran and neighbouring tribal territories also feature cremations accompanied by face masks, burials which are now believed to belong to veterans of the auxiliary units recruited locally by the Roman army to serve in the Rhineland at the beginning of the principate. Full details
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20 October 201616:30

‘Exeter’s first urban community in its European setting. A local perspective on mobile objects and cultural mélange in the early Roman West.’ - Dr Martin Pitts

Exeter’s origins as a fortress established by Legio II Augusta in the 50s AD are relatively well-known. The spectacular bath-house located beneath Cathedral Green was built to fulfil the needs of the soldiers stationed here (assumed to be of Italian origin), only to be demolished after the troops moved on c. 20 years later and the civilian city was established. Since the Roman army tends to be viewed as a somewhat homogenous entity in much modern scholarship, little attention has been given to understanding the range of cultural influences acting on a community such as this in Roman Britain. With particular emphasis on a couple of well-furnished ‘legionary graves’ from Exeter’s fortress phase, this paper will attempt to put Exeter’s first community into a much wider European context through a comparison of contemporary material culture and grave assemblages from a wider area spanning the territories of Belgica, S. Britannia and Germania Inferior. Can soldier-graves really be identified? What can mass-produced objects reveal about shared cultural imaginations in the early Roman West?. Full details
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13 October 201616:30

Destiny's child: Hermione in Colluthus' Abduction of Helen - Marcelina Gilka (PhD, Exeter)

Around 500 AD Colluthus of Lycopolis (in Egypt) wrote a short epic poem entitled The Abduction of Helen, treating the mythical events which ultimately lead to the Trojan War. Towards the end of the piece he introduces Helen's little daughter Hermione and dedicates a significant portion of the text to her lament after she has discovered her mother's elopement. This is a great innovation by the poet, as that particular part of the story had not received such detailed attention from any previous author. My paper is going to give a close reading of the relevant passage and attempt a cultural-historical interpretation. Full details
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5 October 201617:00

Thucydides and the First World War - Professor Neville Morley

Professor Neville Morley gives a Classical Association (South West branch) lecture on Thucydides and the First World War. Full details
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13 January 201614:30

Centre for Connectivity in the Roman World: Research in progress meeting

Lena and Martin will speak on some of the challenges faced in their current research on human mobility in pre-Imperial Italy, and circulating objects in Iron Age to Roman northern Europe, respectively. Full details
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2 December 201516:30

Prof. Maria Wyke (UCL) Ancient Rome in silent cinema

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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25 November 201516:30

Dr David Fearn (Warwick) Ecphrastic politics in Pindar, Pythian One

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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18 November 201516:30

Dr Maria Fragoulaki (Cardiff) Flexibility, fluidity and authorial agency: ethnicity in Thucydides

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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11 November 201516:30

Prof. John Wilkins (Exeter) Galen on the relationship between fish and human beings

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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4 November 201516:30

Dr Kurt Lampe (Bristol) Orestes and the tragicomedy of agency

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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21 October 201516:30

Dr Claire Holleran (Exeter) Migration in Roman Spain

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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14 October 201516:30

Dr Paola Bassino (Exeter) Marcus Musurus, reader of the Certamen Homeri et Hesiodi

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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7 October 201516:30

Prof. Peter Wiseman (Exeter) Augustus and the Roman people

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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30 September 201516:30

Prof. Robin Osborne (Cambridge) The power of images in classical Athens

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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23 September 201516:30

Dr Bill Allan (Oxford) Solon and the rhetoric of stasis

Our weekly research seminars cover a wide range of topics within the literature, history, art, archaeology, society and culture of the ancient world. Papers are given by members of the Department or by visiting scholars, in front of a large and friendly audience mostly consisting of staff and postgraduate students, though everybody is welcome to attend and admission is free. The papers are followed (or punctuated) by informal discussion, and refreshments are served afterwards. For further information, directions etc., please contact Prof. Matthew Wright (m.wright@ex.ac.uk). This list also includes lectures arranged by the Classical Association: these are aimed not just at scholars but also at a wider audience including students, pupils at local schools, and members of the general public. For further information on CA lectures and other events, please contact Prof. Lynette Mitchell (l.g.mitchell@ex.ac.uk).. Full details
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9 - 11 September 2015

Greek Diet, Health, and Medicine in the Roman world

This conference will examine the impact of Greek thought on Roman notions of diet, health and medicine from both the literary and archaeological perspectives with the goal of forming a more holistic understanding of the activities taking place to maintain good health amongst both the elite and non-elite members of Roman society. Full details
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